Friday, July 1, 2011

TTT Dean/Cockroach Richard Matasar Stepping Down from New York Law School


Who doesn’t like to grill a pig over the Fourth of July weekend?

http://www.law.com/jsp/nlj/PubArticleNLJ.jsp?id=1202498790839&Reformer_dean_to_step_down_after_long_tenure_at_New_York_Law_School

"Matasar has been one of the loudest voices for the reform of legal education, along with former Northwestern University School of Law Dean David Van Zandt, who left last year to become the president of The New School in New York. Matasar has chastised law schools for not doing a better job of teaching students the skills legal employers want, and has repeatedly warned that the dual trends of rapidly increasing tuition and diminishing job opportunities for graduates make the existing law school system untenable."

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/law_dean_says_schools_exploiting_students_who_dont_succeed/

On January 9, 2009, Mata$ar made the following comment:

“We own our students' outcomes," Matasar said at the AALS program. "We took them. We took their money. We live on their money. … And if they don't have a good outcome in life, we're exploiting them. It's our responsibility to own the outcomes of our institutions. If they're not doing well ... it's gotta be fixed. Or we should shut the damn place down. And that's a moral responsibility that we bear in the academy.” [Emphasis mine]

Of course, the bastard didn’t do anything to alleviate the situation. In the end, these are meaningless words, from a man who made his living by exploiting the idealism and ambition of young students. Actions matter. By the way, look at how academia and Industry appoint their own “reformers” and “rebels.” They assign this designation to those they KNOW will not actually move for substantive change. Remember, these pigs are doing very well under the current $y$tem.

http://www.nyls.edu/prospective_students/tuition_and_financial_aid

Tuition and Fees: For the 2011-2012 school year, a full-time student at NYLS will be charged $47,800 in tuition and fees. Part-time students at this festering commode will only pay $36,900 in tuition plus fees, for the same academic year.

http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/law-rankings/page+6

Ranking: At such prohibitive costs, this school must have an excellent reputation, right?!?! Wait a moment. As you can see, New York Law Sewer is ranked as the 135th best law school in the land – by US “News” & World Report. It shares this illustrious “honor” with the following four stench pits: Ohio Northern, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, University of St. Thomas, and William Mitchell Commode of Law. Richard must be very proud.

http://www.nyls.edu/user_files/1/3/4/21/CSRS%20Employment%20Stats%20for%20Web%200511%20v1-rev.pdf

Misleading Employment and Starting Salary Statistics: According to this third tier dung heap, 407 out of its 481 graduates, for the Class of 2010, were employed. Using the new formula from USN&WR, only 84.6% of this class found employment, within nine months of graduation. Under the “NYLS Suggested” graphic, 91.9% of the class was employed. This is akin to a guy with a 4.6” penis rounding up to 5 inches. I laughed when I saw that the school noted that 14 JDs were not seeking work, and used “starting a family” as an example. Yes, babies are so cheap, you don’t need any income!

The school notes that the average starting salary – for those in private practice – was $107,343. Keep in mind that less than 107 grads reported their salary to the trash heap. Yes, out of those reporting that they were employed, only 26.3 percent provided their salary info! Do you see how a few successful respondents – from a huge-ass graduating class - can skew survey results?

http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/grad-debt-rankings/page+2

Average Law Student Indebtedness: US “News” lists the average law student indebtedness - for those members of the NYLS Class of 2010 who incurred debt for law school - as $119,437. Furthermore, 93% of this trash pit’s 2010 graduating class took on such toxic debt.

In a phone conversation a few months ago, William Henderson had the nerve to tell me that “Dean Matasar was working hard to improve legal education.” When I pointed out that NYLS is a third tier commode that was then charging it full-time students $46,460 in tuition and fees, Henderson the Pig said the following: “What you don’t understand is that most of those students come from wealthy families, so they aren’t taking on a bunch of debt for the degree.” Apparently, this “legal rebel” had not done any research before opening his snout – to defend his fellow swine.

http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocuments/2010/135/645/2010-135645885-06d18d39-9.pdf

Matasar’s Salary: Head to page 18 of New York Law School's 2010 IRS Form 990. Richard Matasar allegedly worked 35 hours per week as dean and "earned" $519,238 in straight salary, i.e. no other compensation. Yes, Matasar made FIVE HUNDRED NINETEEN THOUSAND, TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHT DOLLARS as president of this TTT sweltering dump - in 2009!!! Matasar also made $495,122 in compensation, for 2008.

http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/27/the-lawyer-surplus-state-by-state/

“In 2009, 9,787 people passed the bar exam in the Empire State. The analysts estimated, though, that New York would need only 2,100 new lawyers each year through 2015. That means that if New York keeps minting new lawyers apace, it will continue having an annual surplus of 7,687 lawyers.”

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, New York has the largest excess of lawyers, by far. Yes, Matasar was a real “reformer,” right?!?! After all, he said the “right” things. And that is what matters to the managing and ruling classes.

In the final, brutal analysis, Richard Matasar does not give one damn about his pupils, prospective students, graduates – or their families. He does not care that many of these people will be financially unable to get married, purchase a home, or have children. Good riddance, cockroach. Don’t worry about your students missing your portly ass.

77 comments:

  1. When I took the NY Bar Exam in 2000 at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in NY City, I sat in a Massive space, bigger than a football field, it seemed.

    And test takers as far as the eye could see in every direction.

    So, so many.

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  2. Disgusting. He's like one of those preachers who rant on about family values, then are caught with a couple of prostitutes and a bag of coke. It's insanity.

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  3. What a piece of shit. Loudest voice for legal education reform my dick.

    I guess they just won't count Nando because he doesn't financially rape the people he purports to help.

    I second paul's comment. His actions are the equivalent of Ted Haggard saying gays are evil then getting it from behind on a meth binge with a gay hooker.

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  4. "NYLS’s Deceptive Practices"

    http://www.lawschooltransparency.com/2011/04/nylss-deceptive-practices/

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  5. To Nando:

    Tell me where and if I'm going wrong with my analysis. Let's say one borrows $225,000 to go to NYLS. If you assume an interest rate of 7% and even assume a repayment over 30 years, that close to $1,500 per month, or $18,000 per year.

    If you're paying $18,000 per year for 30 years, I'm guessing you've got to at least be making $75,000 per year if you want to live somewhere other than a cardboard box. If you have one mistake and get laid off or can't find work, you're really screwed for life because the taxi meter of student debt payments doesn't stop. Owing $18,000 per year basically makes you an indentured servant.

    So to all potential NYLS students: does this risk seem worth it? WIth the market as it is, do you think NYLS will enable you to make that money and keep it going for 30 years?

    In my mind NYLS is the worst of all worlds: extremely high tuition in an overly saturated market.

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  6. ^But when you tell the lemmings at TLS the exact same thing they always respond: IBR.

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  7. Anonymous at 7:39 states the case perfectly.

    Which is why we need a DEBTORS' REVOLT / Default-en-masse.

    Fixing things within an un-fixable, rigged system - that is, politically and such limp-dickery - is not a feasible option.

    As a former finance professional, I say that the finance/lending world is much, much weaker than you think. Yes, lots of bully power to ruin a middle-class family-person's situation, or to make a person tremble in fear of a reduced credit rating. But there is a massive swathe of our society who have no assets to seize, not significant-enough wages to garnish, etc... and hey, there are no jobs out there anyway. If only 20% of people affected by this system would walk away, default, non-participate, or whatever, the finance industry could *not* absorb this and would quickly spiral. This, to me, would be desirable. Collapse a failed, un-fixable system, and rebuild from scratch. 1775-1783 was a painful period, too, but it needed to happen.

    JPR

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  8. I once met a NYLS grad at the gogo bar "New York Dolls," which is located near NYLS. Needless to say, the grad wasn't a patron, she was actually working the pole. So much for a JD from this festering dung pile.

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  9. @ 7:39. I agree with your assessment.

    "In my mind NYLS is the worst of all worlds: extremely high tuition in an overly saturated market."

    One thing you forgot: NYC is one of the most expensive places to live in the U.S. As you pointed out, what happens if you make a "mistake," i.e., get laid off or whatnot through no fault of your own? I'm living that nightmare right now. I arrived in NJ about 10 years ago, was a well-paid associate doing interesting work and was laid off after two years. I have been unable to find similar work, substantively and salary-wise. Basically, I've been working as a temp doing doc review for the past 5-6 years trying to make ends meet while nevertheless trying to pare down my educational debt to a reasonable level so that I can ultimately "move on" with my life. I still owe over $100K after paying the banker bitches for almost 10 years. Kids graduating today have it even worse. When I graduated, my law school was charging $20K/yr in tuition. Not even a decade later, my law school is now charging $40K/yr - double the amount I paid in the early 2000's!

    I know some NYLS grads, of which very few of them are making it. Those that are doing decently graduated many (20+) years ago. My own view is that NYLS is a place where rich kids go to law school and their parents pay the tuition. Obviously that's a generalization, but that's my view based on experience. In addition, this crap hole charges way too much.

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  10. "Who doesn’t liked to grill a pig over the Fourth of July weekend?"

    I don't. I'm a vegetarian. Also, he said sorry. Leave the poor man alone.

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

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  11. Nando, no mention or in depth analysis of anti-Christ Matasar's side job of running Access Group?

    If this shitstain was so serious about reform, he had the position and opportunity to set up a mechanism that would allow for fair and flexible repayment options for the thousands of debt slaves that help keep him healthy and wealthy. You lose your job or have a hardship, call Access Group where some unfriendly bitch on the phone gives you two or three radio-button options for new repayment, all of which will fuck you by increasing the principal in some manner.

    A pox on Matasar I say!

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  12. You fiends of nature forget one thing, IBR. Also, you don't need $75,000 to live well. Case in point: I made $30k in San Francisco, a very expensive city, and traveled internationally twice during this period. Once for 2 weeks in Europe and once for over 2 weeks in the Yucatan. I also paid part of my undergrad tuition and lived in a decent apartment. If I make $75k out of law school I'll be sitting pretty. That's a risk, I, top 18%, am willing to take. Also, I threw in an application to NYLS. I hope they accept me. Seems like a fine institution in a very fine city.

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

    P.S. I got an internship that starts Monday!!!

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  13. Tuesday^

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

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  14. Good God, I suppose anyone can go to law school today. Look at the this Stephen McDaniel in the following video clip:

    http://www.newscentralga.com/news/local/Macon-Police-Body-Found-on-Georgia-Ave-Ruled-as-Homicide-124823519.html?skipthumb=Y

    No wonder the legal profession is so TTT. Law schools will let anyone in.

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  15. 12:12PM

    You are a fucking moron. If you read the story rather than looked at the video only, you would learn that the mentally unstable law student in the story was arrested for burglary and is a person of interest in the murder of the classmate. And no one, I repeat NO ONE with a 180 LSAT and 4.0 GPA from Harvard would attend a TTT such as Mercer.

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  16. Kirk (top 16.23%!)July 1, 2011 at 12:50 PM

    Odnan + WTLS = comedy gold.

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  17. The piece of trash attending WNEC Sewer of Law keeps making it up, as he goes along. (Too bad you forgot that Monday is one of those large national holidays, in your 9:55 am post. Most people tend to know the date when they start a job - or even an unpaid internship.) What next, bitch? Are you going to tell us that you are making $160K, as a recent graduate of your fourth tier dung heap?

    @9:52 am,

    I wanted to make mention of the dog’s role on Access Group’s board. However, I did not want the main entry to be too lengthy.

    http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocuments/2010/232/719/2010-232719985-06cdedbd-9.pdf

    On page 33 of Access Group’s 2010 IRS Form 990, you can see that Cockroach Matasar is chairman of the board. Apparently, the pig does not earn a salary, in this role. I suppose he simply “serves” on the corporate board, for his own pleasure.

    If you scroll down the page, you will note that Christopher Chapman, president and CEO of Access Group, made $733,284 in TOTAL COMPENSATION, for 2009. Yes, the swine raked in $690,618 in reportable income - plus $42,568 in “estimated amount of other compensation from the organization and related organizations.”

    http://www.linkedin.com/pub/christopher-chapman/7/21a/372

    Here is Chri$topher Chapman’s ugly mug, via his LinkedIn profile. Apparently, he was a senior attorney at Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP. What a beacon of integrity and ethics, huh?!?! My guess is that the ABA wouldn’t give a damn if he was both a practicing attorney - and making large sums of cash on the backs of students. Who knows? They would probably name him to the ABA’s Standing Committee on “Ethics” and “Professional Responsibility.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Access_Group

    “Access Group operates out of Wilmington, Delaware. Christopher P. Chapman serves as the company’s president and chief executive officer. Richard A. Matasar, the dean and president of New York Law School, currently serves as the chair of the board of directors.”

    Does it surprise anyone that this filthy turd has its corporate headquarters in Wilmington?!

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  18. I know that my views regarding "change" are probably unpopular and somewhat cruel--but something needs to give and someone has to take the first step Who will be our Mohamed Bouazizi?

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  19. I like angel's idea. Norman Morrison self-immolated himself outside the Pentagon in order to protest the Vietnam war.

    bad example. Didn't that stupid fucking war last for another 10 years after that?

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  20. I,too, like Angel's idea. There was a guy who said he was going to set himself on fire publicly, in DC, to protest modern indentured servitude and predatory student loan practices. I like it. Someone should... it's an honorable method of protest with a long history.

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  21. Just a thought Re Matasar's stepping down?

    Why Now?

    Maybe Matasar knows of something in the wind,or suspects that there are things to come in the way of lawsuits against the schools,
    and is getting out before things get really hot?

    His reasons for stepping down seem kind of thin and vague. Don't you think?

    And @2:17 The thought of someone setting his or herself on fire is too horrible for words.

    What has this word become?

    There has to be a Civilized, Human solution.

    I write much about thoughts of suicide, which are natural for someone absurdly deep in debt with no hope for getting out.

    They used joke with a dark humor about walking up and down the sidewalks of Manhattan after the 1929 stock market crash, and dodging all the bodies of the suicides falling out of the upper windows of the surrounding buildings.

    If the person that mentioned setting himself on fire in DC is reading this, please feel free to e-mail me to discuss, and I can even talk on the phone.

    Please do not do anything desperate.

    There is always a solution, even if it means leaving the country, which is where I am at now.

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  22. @ jdpainterguy, don't be too quick to automatically label someone's action as "desperate" or to equate self-immolation necessarily with desperation or illness - and judgementalism is uncalled for, as in contrasting such with a "civilized, human solution".

    Some people, from different traditions than yours, who view death from a different perspective, don't deserve to be subject to pidgeonholing language. There is, indeed, even in the West a long tradition of very well-reasoned, stable people being willing to die in either protest or because they believe in a cause.

    It hurts the cause to have people who automatically make assumptions and jump to use labeling or judgment-ridden language. We should feel like we can put all options out there without being stifled by nannies.

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  23. Nando, silly goose, I was thinking Monday, but meant Tuesday. My Monday is Tuesday, because that is the day I go to work, even though to everyone else it is Tuesday. It is MY Monday though. And yes, I got an unpaid legal internship. I also have a court clerk position too if I want to pursue it. That's 2 positions in one summer. Add that to volunteering outside of the US, and you got one hell of an impressive topic to discuss with employers for OCI.

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

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  24. July 1, 2011 3:10 PM:

    One thing for sure, kiddo, is you have an AWFUL lot of free time on your hands.

    I simply do not believe you at all.

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  25. I don't buy this kid's schtick either. Just look at his writing. I'm not sure this retard could get into WNEC law toilet.

    First the boy says he was traveling the world. This indicates someone was on vacation. He never mentioned volunteering around the world until now. That raises eyebrows.

    Also signing everything with | Top 18% (from Western New England) is like someone bragging 'I just ate a 230 lb girl's pussy.' That just isn't something to brag about. Tell you what child. Go take that imaginary 2nd job too. Working 60-80 hrs a week for free is a great and valuable way to spend ones summer. If OCI didn't lead to shit in first year, you are basically fucked. Esp. from a TTTT.

    On Tuesday I have a job interview. I graduated from a decent state first tier last year and I have been getting by on various pt work. I've had this marked on my calendar for a week. I know it's for 9:30 am on Tuesday. I would not get this confused with Monday, when everyone observes the holiday on that day. Nice try, shitling.

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  26. Anyone remember the poem: ‟The Walrus and the Carpenter” in Lewis’s Carroll’s ‟Through the Looking Glass”?

    The Walrus speaks sweetly to the oysters, acknowledges his own ‟cruel trick” in luring them into his clutches, and weeps copiously and sympathetically for their predicament Meanwhile, he devours as many as he can.

    'I like the Walrus best,' said Alice: `because you see he was a little sorry for the poor oysters.' `He ate more than the Carpenter, though,' said Tweedledee.

    Noble words to win public plaudits and for the sake of self-image. All the while, exhibiting behavior that is piggish, cruel, backstabbing, and hypocritical.

    That is Carroll's Walrus and that is Matasar and Henderson.

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  27. Love the fucking troll talking about IBR. Okay, sure, it is great IF you obtain a qualifying position and IF you keep it ten years. IBR for private practice leaves you with a massive amount hanging over your head; and, I believe the tax burden still happens at 25 years or so.

    NYLS is the worst law school in the country bar none. Most expensive city, near Yale tuition, and the ABA guide said they only give 40% any sort of scholarship and I bet it comes with strings attached. I have more respect for Cooley because at least Lansing and the 50 satellite campuses have a relatively low cost of living.

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  28. "We should feel like we can put all options out there without being stifled by nannies.

    July 1, 2011 3:09 PM"

    WHOA! we ARE in the context of student loan debt, are we not? Isn't it a little, just a tad, over the top to equate student loan debt with, like, porotesting a real war or the treatmet of political prisoners? You're jumping down PainterGuy's throat for merely trying to keep things a bit proportional here? Are you the opinion police of the site?

    Give me a break.

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  29. Matasar is worse than a pig. At least a pig can feed a large amount of people. These animals are happy rolling in mud or shit. They don;t derive pleasure by ruining people's financial futures. You should've compared him to pig shit. That would be a better comparison.

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  30. What is up with triple or quadruple ties for law school rankings? I think the ranking system is stupid, but if you are going to rank how do you have ties?

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  31. July 1 @8:37

    I know. This person sounds like he or she would play the human torch in front of the landlord's house because he raised the rent.

    In the case of Student Loans, one can always leave the country.

    If a nannie sees her charge about to jump, what is she supposed to do, let the kid jump, or reach out and pull the kid back in?

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  32. Check out this blog from someone eagerly anticipating starting law school this year:

    http://1lawreview.wordpress.com/about/

    Don't bother commenting on the blog though as she has "had enough with the negativity."

    Simply hilarious and further proof that you can't save people from themselves.

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  33. http://1lawreview.wordpress.com/about/

    “i’ve spent nearly the last six years researching law schools.

    i’ve spend months and over $1,500 on LSAT classes, books, and related materials. along with that, LSAT registration fees, 24 (total) application fees and 24 total LSAC reports.

    i’ve prepared by reading more than a handful of books on the legal field, taking classes that i thought would aid me in my future legal studies, working at the DA’s office and now a PI law firm gaining experience, and applying to law school a second time when i didn’t get in the first time around.”

    This person is hard-headed. Unlike the piece of trash from Chicopee, MA allegedly attending We$TTTTern New England College $chool of Law, at least this person has worked in the legal field - in a prosecutor’s office and at a personal injury firm. Hence, she has some understanding of what it takes to be a lawyer.

    The fact that she needed to apply twice to law schools - and her admittedly low LSAT score - indicates that she will not be attending a highly-ranked law school. The fact remains that those - from modest backgrounds - who attend lower-ranked schools need to EXCEL academically simply to have a chance at summer associate work after their first year.

    As we all know, first semester and first year grades pretty much set your course, in the “profession.” That should tell the lemmings something. (Do you see dental students come unglued when they receive a C in a first year class? How often do you see American medical students lament their situation, because they did not attend a top medical school?)

    http://www.vault.com/wps/portal/usa/vcm/detail/Career-Advice/Education-Advice/The-Importance-of-Law-School-Grades?id=5622&filter_type=0&filter_id=0

    “The importance of the first year cannot be overstated: a string of A's maximizes every opportunity your law school has to offer.

    This is because top-paying, national law firms recruit students in the fall of the second year. The firms' selection process is as cruel as calculus. Three lines of your resume matter: school, class rank and GPA. Recruiters rarely even read resumes from candidates below the top 30%, and the majority of the jobs earned during law school go to top 10% students. If you fail to be in the top 10% at the end of the first year, you will not have another opportunity as a law student to interview with such a large number of firms again.”

    If you attend a piece of garbage such as WNEC Sewer of Law, even landing in the top 10% does not guarantee one a paying job. We have reached the point of lawyer OVER-SATURATION, where top 10%-20% of students at decent law schools are not landing legal positions. One of my former Third Tier Drake classmates missed grading onto law review by two or three spots. Guess what he did that summer?! He worked in a call center!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  34. http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=4016716.0

    On December 10, 2008, at 11:26:29 am, LSD poster “legalese_retard” wrote the following entry:

    “Haven't posted on here in a while, but someone emailed me and wanted an update. I graduated last December and I still don't have a legal job. I have been working at Starbucks and work at a free legal clinic part-time, but the job prospects keep getting weaker and weaker. I graduated from a good law school, with decent grades, and have a marketable resume (according to my school's OCS), but I never anticipated how long it would take me to find a job in a bad economy.

    Basically, this is just a friendly reminder for you future lawyers that there is no sure thing after law school (even if you go to a top tier school). Make sure you are prepared to be unemployed for over a year after you graduate. If you can't afford that risk, I recommend going to a school that gives a really good scholarship or wait and save some money before you attend.”

    At the time of this posting, the poster notes that he was WORKING AT STARBUCKS - while helping at a free legal clinic.

    http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/law-rankings/page+2

    The author claims that he graduated from Tulane University Law School, in December 2007. As you can see, Tulane currently has the 47th best law school, in the country - according to US “News” & World Report. In a later comment, the author notes that he passed the Texas bar exam, and could not even land a doc review position.

    In a follow-up comment that same day, at 12:21:05 pm, “legalese_retard” wrote:

    “[A] lot of people go into the law thinking it is recession proof and that people will always need lawyers. I have been applying to bankruptcy and litigation boutique firms, but they aren't hiring either (even though they probably need the help). Until the economy hits rock bottom, I think there is going to be a hiring freeze. Also, I have noticed that sometimes having the JD hurts a little. I've tried applying to non-legal jobs and utilizing my undergraduate degree, but those places see a JD and assume that I would only use them as a stepping stone until the economy got better (rightfully so).”

    This is not news to anyone who has been to law school - and who has been relegated to looking for non-legal positions.

    http://thepeoplestherapist.com/2010/11/03/extremely-versatile-crockery/

    Check out former Biglaw associate Will Meyerhofer’s take on the supposed “versatility” of a law degree.

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  35. http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/227376_10150172519844140_130040239139_6530041_3846309_n.jpg

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  36. At this point, only the complete fucking retards are not aware that law school is a terrible gamble. Is this who you're trying to reach?

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  37. Nando, you should do a post on that douche that calls himself "Mr. Law Skool." This emaciated looking fucker looks like he came out of gulag keeps touting the virtues of law school on youtube. He goes to a TTT law school but what he won't disclose is that he comes from well to do parents and has connections in the entertainment industry. I am convinced this kid is on the ABA payroll for enticing lemmings into applying for law school.

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  38. the fact that first semester grades are everything is probably the only silver lining in law school. Administrators and professors desperately don't want you to know this, because they want to collect as much cash as possible off your doomed hide. If you aren't at least in the top 15% of the class after first semester you should drop out. The game is over after 1st semester. If you're ranked at median you're finished. Even if you finish number 1 in your class next semester, that still puts you at the 25th percentile which isn't good enough.

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  39. July 2, 2011 4:58 PM

    Pretty much. In my own case, it was not so much that going to law school was a mistake. What was a mistake was not knowing when to quit.

    Contrary to what I was taught, it is not ALWAYS advantageous to "stick with it" and "tough it out". I was ignorant and didn't know that, essentially, it is all over after your First Year in law school.

    I now happily work outside law, but at times, the JD has been a ball and chain, it really has.

    ReplyDelete
  40. I have been in this business for over 20 years. I can tell you that I have noticed a decline in quality of lawyers that law schools produce these days. I am not even talking about the cesspools featured on this site, which my firm doesn't even consider. I am talking about top schools such as Harvard, Columbia, NYU, UPenn, etc.. It seems that there is a deep sense of entitlement that these kids have acquired. I don't know if they have watched too many bad lawyer movies/TV shows but I can tell you that Hollywood does a poor job of portraying the legal business. First of all, there are hardly any "hot babes" in the legal profession. Perhaps the secretarial pool but female lawyers are typically homely at best. Second, $160K a year does not entitle you to buy a house and drive a Mercedes. In NYC, 45% of $160K will go to some form of taxes. A cheap studio apt. in the City will cost you at least $2,500.00/mo. in a bad area no less. Add the cost of living in NYC (eating out, cup of coffee, transportation), plus servicing student loans, and you are basically living in squalor. Quite frankly, I don't even know why any college grad these days would want to go to law school. It is a cutthroat environment, the professors will look at you with scorn and condescension and it will cost you a fortune to enter a business where you will live in austerity.

    This Nando fellow is doing you folks a favor. Many of you think you will beat the odds because you are a paper tiger (i.e., 4.0 GPA from State U. with liberal arts B.A., 160LSAT score, recommendations from the Pope). Here is the truth. You are not remarkable. If you were remarkable, you wouldn't be applying to these third tier commodes or paying sticker at a top law school.

    The only kids I see making it after law school are the ones that are well connected or from wealthy backgrounds. If you are a minority or the "first" to graduate from college, law school is a sucker's bet. People like "top 18%" from a no-name law school will have no future in the legal business unless they go solo and hit it big. Unfortunately, most law grads do not know how to practice law or possess the charisma to build a clientele. From what I hear, going solo requires capital $$$. If you are already $150K in the hole, no bank will give you a business loan. Thus, you better have a rich daddy or pedophile uncle with a guilty conscience that is about to kick the bucket and leave you his estate, otherwise, the game was over for you ever since you stepped foot into law school on your first day.

    NYC Hiring Partner

    ReplyDelete
  41. NYC Hiring Partner back in da house!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Nando. What was the Tulane student's class rank? There's always a lot more to the story. You all act like a single variable is what counts, and you always choose the variable which suits your needs for the particular argument. Remember who you are arguing with. A person who studied Economics and knows a LOT about statistics.

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

    ReplyDelete
  43. Nando, you should do a post on the ridiculous farce known as ABA's "legal rebels"

    hahahahahahah

    ReplyDelete
  44. Yesterday, in Columbus, Ohio, I was in a pizza restaurant and went to the restroom. Above the urinal was an advertisement for some small law firm.
    When I saw it a nearly pissed on myself from laughing.

    ReplyDelete
  45. http://thepeoplestherapist.com/2011/05/04/someone-likes-a-quitter/

    "I spent the second year of my social work internship working at a community center, which offered one of the top smoking cessation programs in the country.

    One fine spring day I was sprawled, sunning myself, on a bench in the courtyard of the center when a fellow intern lit up a cigarette. I proposed she give the cessation program a try.

    “No one likes a quitter,” she quipped, exhaling a cloud of toxins.

    Uh…huh. Except there’s a proviso in that statement – a “carve-out” in the contract language – covering the quitting of something self-destructive. Like smoking.

    Or a pointless march through law school.

    I’d like to speak in defense of quitting, and quitters.

    Quitting can be about more than stopping whatever you’re doing. It can be about waking up and asking yourself if what you’re doing makes sense and is worth continuing.

    If you’re plugging away dutifully through the legal education process with no real idea why – it might be time to quit.

    Does this mean I’m seriously advising young law students all over the country to give up and drop out – simply abandon their legal education mid-way through?

    Yes.

    I am prescribing a mass exodus from law schools. A semi-mass exodus might do the trick.

    Tune in. Turn on. Drop out.

    If you don’t know why you’re there – and you’re not sure what you’re getting yourself into – if you’re not at a top school, or even if you are, and your grades are a little iffy, and likely to stay that way – then please, get out. Today. Before you spend another cent.

    The legal education scam works because it follows two key rules of all successful Ponzi schemes:

    First, it plays to your greed. You dig your own hole because you’re in it for the money.

    Second, it keeps you distracted. You never realize you’re getting fleeced."

    This advice is from former Biglaw associate Will Meyerhofer. Unlike the piece of trash at WNEC Sewer of Law, Meyerhofer knows what he is talking about.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I completely agree with NY Hiring Partner. The quality of new attorneys (those who graduated during mid 00's to 2009) are alarmingly in the dark. In all my years working as a legal secretary, I have never seen anything quite like this before. I can understand not possessing confidence, and being a little unsure and uneasy about things in handling the first case, however the conduct and lack of knowledge displayed by these new attorneys is just appalling. And no...these people are not graduates of TTT's. I am talking about newly minted attorneys who are graduates of Fordham, Columbia, and Rutgers.

    One attorney who I work with is a 2006 graduate of Fordham and this guy knows little. I mean VERY little. I actually feel embarrassed for this guy with some of the questions he asks. For example, he asked the other day when depositions are scheduled and we just served our answer. I have to really wonder what the hell professors are teaching today. I had to explain to this guy that a preliminary conference is scheduled first and depositions are held after most of discovery is exchanged. If that was not bad enough, he asked what would happen if during the deposition, we should find out additional information about the plaintiff. How can we possibly avoid going to trial to flesh out this new information after depositions are held?

    :-O

    It's frightening that this is an example of what is graduating from a T50 schools these days. These newly minted attorneys know little about procedures, motion practice, and discovery. These are just the basics mind you. Only thing working in favor for this guy is that he is well connected, otherwise I doubt he would remain employed at many law firms.

    ReplyDelete
  47. NANDO - GET THAT FUCK J.D. PAINTER OFF YOUR FUCKING BLOG NOW!!! WE'RE SICK OF HAVING TO BE BARRAGED WITH HIS ABJECT NONSENSE!!!

    ReplyDelete
  48. I agree with NYC Hiring Partner. If you don't have the $$$ to go solo (and at the same time have the funds to meet your other debt expenses), you are fooling yourself. Opening up a law practice in your mommy's basement is not a winning strategy.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Nando: I support JD Painter. He has done a very good job of personalizing the problem. Any good trial lawyer will tell you that emotional personal testimony combined with expert evidence always beats a dry case consisting just of expert evidence.

    @9:54: They teach absolutely nothing of substance at any law school, be it Yale or Cooley, so you really are going to have to teach the young lawyers all of the fundamentals. The problem with your guy not knowing the bare fundamentals is that it shows that he has no interest whatsoever in practicing law. He is a liberal arts major who wanted to make a lot of money and saw no other way. I knew that depos come after the answer because I read lots of books and newspaper articles about big lawsuits, not because law school taught it. Your guy hasn’t read any books or articles about law in his free time because he just doesn’t care about anything besides his paycheck.

    NY Hiring Partner: Opening a non-biglaw (criminal, divorce, PI, bankruptcy, etc) law office requires only: 1. A laptop computer, 2. A cell phone. 3. A virtual office for $50/mo (permitted in most states) and 4. Some money for marketing expenses ($5-10k). I have a friend who has no desire to do biglaw. He is going to the lowest ranked and cheapest law school he could find and will then follow this path.

    -MMA lawyer

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  50. MMA good luck to your friend. He'll need it. At least he was smart enough to keep his expenses down.

    It is mad how many law school idiots will turn down serious money to attend a TT or TTT so they can attend a school ranked 30th (and get no money to go there). In reality, it doesn't much matter if your school is ranked 30th or53rd. The job prospects are pretty much the same for the most part. One of my friends was top 20% at University of Minnesota and she did not land anything during OCI. This was back in 2004 or 2005. Kids who are top 1/5 at shitholes have few options that don't involve slinging lattes.

    ReplyDelete
  51. This guy looks like a fucking gremlin.

    http://juxtaposition.axley.net/archives/gremlins.jpg

    Oh. Actually the gremlins look better than this ugly, ugly, ugly bastard.

    ReplyDelete
  52. MMA Lawyer:

    Perhaps I don't know what you need to run a small law practice these days but I served on a practice committee in my jurisdiction a few years ago and I can tell you that virtual offices give your practice no credibility. Meeting clients at the Bar Association library or at a local Starbucks creates confidentiality problems and you look like a chump.

    Also, you need a secretary. And they are not cheap. Ever see a cowboy movie? Ok better question, ever see a cowboy movie where the cowboy has no horse? I bet you can't name one Clint Eastwood wild wild west movie where he has no horse. Do you follow me yet? A lawyer without a secretary is like a cowboy without a horse.

    You also forgot malpractice insurance, which I realize most newly minted lawyers won't need because they have no assets but who is going to defend you when you get that first bar complaint or fee arbitration matter? You need the insurance and many jurisdictions are starting to mull over imposing it as a mandatory requirement like CLE. I mean hey, if Obama can cram down mandatory healthcare insurance down a small business's throats, what makes you think they won't be able to impose malpractice insurance, which I hear is expensive.

    I like how these new lawyers believe all they need is a cellphone and laptop to run an office. Sure you can muster a few clients that way but in the end you will never make it taking these shortcuts. It is a model that is not sustainable over time.

    MMA Lawyer, I am afraid your friend is a bit too late to the party. Divorce and bankruptcy software and petition/pleading preparers do the job for a fraction of the price of a real lawyer. Also, PI is dried up, has been for many years. These days, you have to dedicate hundreds of hours to get a lousy low 5 figure settlement. And your cut is only a third.

    In sum, I echo NY hiring partner's sentiment on this subject. THe law schools are selling kids, like your MMA'a friend, a pipe dream. Sure he/she may know a solo that has made it but for every successful solo, there are dozens of failed lawyers.

    JP

    ReplyDelete
  53. JP is right. Ins. companies are now willing to fight you like two feral cats fighting over an injured robin over a standard PIP auto claim. Shit, experience PI lawyers are now happy to get that $50K settlement.

    MMA go to the entry on UNLV on this site. Several people pointed out the cut-rate lawyers out there. You cannot compete with assholes offering their services for $500 or $1000. These mills have volume. They can afford to do a no-fault divorce or DWI for $1000. Baby lawyers with $100K in debt cannot do this.

    Another thing but it kind of goes along with what i wrote above: the larger firms have a reputation and big advertising budgets. How in fuck is your buddy going to compete with that? Do you think your local HS football team has a prayer against the New England Patriots if they just catch a few lucky breaks? OK, we're not talking Butler-North Carolina in men's basketball. Those teams are somewhat evenly matched, where superior coaching or heart can make up for any deficits. We're talking about a severe disadvantage.

    ReplyDelete
  54. @ 9:16:

    I forgot to include malpractice insurance. This should run a young lawyer $1-3k a year. I stand corrected.

    The point of a virtual office is for the client not to know that it is a virtual office. Small law clients are not that sophisticated anyway and don't need a Wall Street office. Most virtual offices, and virtual phone numbers, also come with a receptionist. You'll have to be your own secretary until you make money. Obviously as your practice grows you'll rent a real office and hire a real paralegal.

    You absolutely should not compete with cheap lawyers. Sell yourself on quality, not price. Don't become a cheap lawyer. Reject cheapskate clients outright.

    I don't understand what it means that PI is "dried up" and that you must spend "hundreds of hours" for a $50k case. For a 4 witness auto accident case, you do the basic discovery questions, you take a couple of depositions, and then either settle or spend 1-2 days trying it. Where do the "hundreds of hours" come from? If the case is worth $300k and the insurance company is offering $50k, then simply try it and ask the jury for it.

    -MMA lawyer

    ReplyDelete
  55. *Bitchslaps Nando*

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

    ReplyDelete
  56. In this recession, good luck finding a sympathetic jury that is willing to award big bucks. Most people are jaded and resent plaintiffs looking for a quick pay day. In my jurisdiction, juries will no cause a case rather than award any money. So yes, if you do depositions and take it to trial and are out on expert and medicals, you are fucked.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Hot off the Philadelphia Inquirer's presses: "From Defendant to Prosecutor in Seven Years," the tale of how a reformed drug dealer with seven arrests in his past landed a position as an assistant district attorney, aided by the recommendation of Temple Law dean JoAnne Epps and others. Are we now to conclude that having a criminal past is what it takes to avoid the legal profession's unemployment line?

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20110704_From_defendant_to_prosecutor_in_seven_years.html

    ReplyDelete
  58. "Are we now to conclude that having a criminal past is what it takes to avoid the legal profession's unemployment line?"

    No, he just knows where all the bodies are buried...

    ReplyDelete
  59. I enjoyed lighting Cockroach Richard Matasar up like a Roman Candle over the holiday weekend. Do you want to see more hypocrisy, crass opportunism and insincerity?

    http://alumni.nyls.edu/Page.aspx?pid=334

    "Calling the construction of a new academic building the “physical manifestation of our destiny,” Dean Richard A. Matasar presided over a groundbreaking ceremony on August 1st in the parking lot at New York Law School, which is the site for the new Law School building .

    Dean Matasar was joined by Arthur Abbey ’59, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, as well as other Board members, faculty, and staff at the early morning ceremony. The Dean said that New York Law School had been founded by people who were “rebels” who “broke new ground in their time.”

    “Today we follow in their footsteps,” the Dean commented. “It’s upon us to break new ground of a different kind.”

    What a true humanitarian and "rebel," huh?!?!

    Richard Matasar - despite his "reformer" label - does not give one damn about his students or graduates. He simply wants to work on recruiting the next cohort of lemmings. In fact, NYLS features incredibly large class sizes. It also charges HUGE sums of money, in the way of tuition and fees. On top of this, New York City is the most expensive large city in this country, for a person to reside.

    Furthermore, the New York legal job market is COMPLETELY OVERSATURATED! Students are taking on massive amounts of NON-DISCHARGEABLE debt - and very few will ever make Biglaw. In the end, what the hell is the point of taking on an additional $115K-$150K for a degree that may land you a job that pays $45K per year?!?!

    To the retard in Chicopee, MA: We can see that you have no life. Do you really want to advertise that to the world, bitch?!?!

    ReplyDelete
  60. TIME Magazine: "Consumers Finally Figure Out That Law School is Overrated"

    http://moneyland.time.com/2011/07/05/consumers-finally-figure-out-that-law-school-is-overrated/

    ReplyDelete
  61. "The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

    July 4, 2011 5:54 PM"

    A little early in the game for you to be gloating.

    Whatever else may be said, though one might bathe after a day's hard labor, even spray a toothless crack-whore with Chanel No. 5, one never, ever erases the putrid stench of the TTT JD.

    ReplyDelete
  62. I graduated from New York Law School in 1995. I was in the top 25% of my class. I was hired after graduation by a prestigious New York firm, at an annual salary of $90,000 (considered high at that time). I am now a partner and live very well.

    Many of my New York Law School classmates have had similar or greater success. While I sincerely regret the difficulties recent law school graduates face, it mostly stems from a weak economy rather than the quality of legal education.

    I wish the very best to graduates of all law schools in their careers but placing blame on New York Law School or any other school will only hurt future employment opportunities.

    ReplyDelete
  63. 95? Clinton's first term? lol ...so your opinion is relevant how?

    ReplyDelete
  64. 2:22 PM has never seen the BLS numbers.

    ReplyDelete
  65. The above poster asks for the relevance of comments from a 1995 New York Law School grad who is now a partner at a major firm.

    First, it seems that his or her success coming out of NYLS completely refutes the notion expressed on this board that diplomas from third tier schools are worthless.

    Second, he or she has been practicing for some time, and probably knows more about the legal profession than recent law school grads.

    Third, he or she is a partner at a law firm, so just may know something about hiring.

    ReplyDelete
  66. This does not negate the fact that 1995 is EONS ago in terms of what is going on in the economy. What is happening in law, unlike some other sectors, is PERMANENT job loss.

    I cannot ever recall anyone on this blog saying ALL toilet bowl law degrees are useless, or that ALL toilet bowllaw grads fail to find legal employment. Rather, this and he other scamblogs merely point out the very high risks involved in pursuing a law degree form one of these reprehensible sewers NOWADAYS, i.e., in the 21st fucking century.

    ReplyDelete
  67. "First, it seems that his or her success coming out of NYLS completely refutes the notion expressed on this board that diplomas from third tier schools are worthless."

    No one has ever said the a JD was completely worthless for every single grad from a TTT LS. What is being said is that for MOST TTT grads, especially IN THIS DAY AND AGE, it will prove worthless. There will always be a lucky FEW that make it even from a TTT. But on "average" it is worthless.

    Also 1995 is a LONG TIME AGO. The attorney glut vis-a-vis actual attorney work is worse now than it was back then. AND moreover, I am certain that the tuition and debt, even accounting for inflation, is much worse for recent grads than for grads from many years past.

    ReplyDelete
  68. EVEN IN 1995, that particular poster clearly makes note of the fact he was TOP 25%. Now, put that top 25% caveat on top of TODAY'S MARKETPLACE and we're talkin' TOP 10-maybe TOP 5%, would be needed from that same toilet bowl, in order to just get a job.

    Not good odds.

    ReplyDelete
  69. I just got in today and I would like to thank anonymous above who told Nando and crew the truth. I don't know for sure if I will be attending NYLS, but it's a possibility.

    The World Traveling Law Student | Top 18%

    P.S. lovin' my internship, that's why I'm not on here as much.

    ReplyDelete
  70. The truth is that it is a MONSTROUS, reprehensible risk to attend that festering sewer pipe.

    ReplyDelete
  71. I am mystified by the vitriol directed at New York Law School, which has excellent facilities, an outstanding faculty and a high pass rate on the nation's second most challenging bar exam.

    A weak economy has limited opportunities for law school graduates in recent years; this is unfortunate but don't blame the law schools.

    Following the logic expressed by some posters here, they should really blame the "toilet bowl" and "sewer pipe" colleges they attended for not preparing them for admission to Harvard Law School or Yale Law School.

    ReplyDelete
  72. The people who responded to the 1995 NYLS grad are obviously unfamiliar with the job market for new lawyers in 1995. But that's an anecdotal point.

    Generally, the negative comments expressed on this board are inaccurate, unfounded, misplaced and rather silly. This is a disservice to prospective law school students and the broader legal profession.

    Nando and others seem to suggest that law schools, upon admitting a student, should either guarantee legal employment at graduation or get a waiver from the student acknowledging the absence of a job guarantee.

    A poster above writes "it is a MONSTOUS, reprehensible risk" to attend New York Law School.

    I'm sorry, but risk of what? People apply to law school, take out loans and pay tuition of their own free will. The Law School provides a legal education at tuition rates comparable to other private law schools, and about 86% of graduates pass the NY bar exam on their first try. So, it seems that students get what they pay for. If they'd rather pay less tuition by attending CUNY or SUNY, that is their choice. If they'd rather use the $135,000 (NYLS tuition for 3 years) for a down payment on a home, or to start a business or go on a really awesome vacation, that is their choice.

    For those expecting a big monetary payoff on graduation day, caveat emptor. Some NYLS grads step right into high paying jobs at top firms, many do not. All should take pride in receiving a juris doctorate, a considerable achievement.

    ReplyDelete
  73. As you can see, the tool who posted on July 6, 2011 at 2:22 pm is the same person who posted the July 10th comments at 6:26 am and 10:15 am.

    Time Visitor Session
    Jul 10 2011 11:41am 38.112.19.182 1 action 1m
    Jul 10 2011 11:01am 38.112.19.182 1 action 10s
    Jul 10 2011 10:15am 38.112.19.182 2 actions 1m 29s
    Jul 10 2011 9:52am 38.112.19.182 1 action 8m 40s
    Jul 10 2011 6:09am 38.112.19.182 5 actions 17m 13s
    Jul 8 2011 4:34am 38.112.19.182 1 action 7m
    Jul 7 2011 2:07pm 38.112.19.182 1 action 1m
    Jul 7 2011 11:30am 38.112.19.182 1 action 1m
    Jul 7 2011 9:13am 38.112.19.182 1 action 1m
    Jul 7 2011 7:49am 38.112.19.182 1 action 10s
    Jul 7 2011 6:16am 38.112.19.182 1 action 10s
    Jul 7 2011 5:14am 38.112.19.182 1 action 2m
    Jul 7 2011 4:15am 38.112.19.182 6 actions 15m 47s
    Jul 6 2011 3:32pm 38.112.19.182 1 action 7m
    Jul 6 2011 2:11pm 38.112.19.182 5 actions 11m 49s

    http://ip-whois-lookup.com/lookup.php?ip=38.112.19.182

    Host name: MorrisonCohenSingerWeinstein.demarc.cogentco.com

    Nice try, Paul L. Porretta!

    http://www.morrisoncohen.com/Porretta.htm

    On July 6, 2011 at 4:40 pm, Paul L. Porretta of Morrison Cohen sent me an email, which started:

    “I graduated from New York Law School in 1995. I was in the top 25% of my class. I was hired upon graduation by Reid & Priest LLP, later known as Thelen Reid & Priest LLP. My starting salary at Reid & Priest was comparable to that at the most prestigious firms in New York (Cravath, Skadden, etc.). I am now a partner at Morrison Cohen LLP. Many of my New York Law School classmates have had similar or greater success.”

    I replied to his email, and have not heard back after my second response.

    Congratulations on making partner, coming out of that overpriced stink pit. Then again, you left that toilet 16 years ago. The job market has changed since that time. Look at the rise of LPOs. Also, why don’t you tell us how much tuition was when you attended NYL$, Paul?!?! It is beyond pathetic that a partner feels the need to post anonymously in support of his earlier anonymous comment.

    ReplyDelete
  74. "For those expecting a big monetary payoff on graduation day, caveat emptor. Some NYLS grads step right into high paying jobs at top firms, many do not. All should take pride in receiving a juris doctorate, a considerable achievement."

    Caveat Emptor only applies if said law schools published fully transparent employment data. When they post false and misleading data, then that doesn't quite apply. Rather what applies is fraud and deception!

    The seller of goods and services has the moral an ethical obligation to fully disclose material facts. You can't just sell shoddy goods and services and then cry out "caveat emptor"!

    As for a JD being a "considerable achievement" that is a complete joke. Almost anyone can get into some law school somewhere and get a JD if they are willing to pay for it.

    ReplyDelete
  75. "Following the logic expressed by some posters here, they should really blame the "toilet bowl" and "sewer pipe" colleges they attended for not preparing them for admission to Harvard Law School or Yale Law School.

    July 10, 2011 6:26 AM"

    I am mystified by the fact that people still don't see law as an overcrowded field.

    Next time you go in for a check-up, ask your physician if those who failed to get in the top 10% of his class were thrown in the trash, forever unable to get a residency ANYWHERE; ask him if he went to Harvard or Yale, or simply an "elite" medical school (he will likely look at you strangely).

    What is so fucking difficult to grasp about the concept of the scambloggers' simply warning the kids about the high risk of going to law school and the fact that the lower-ranked the law school is, the higher risk to the student? What is so complex to grasp about that, or so offensive? It is true in the context of this horrifically overcrowded "professsion."

    ReplyDelete
  76. The following is an opinion based on personal experience with NYLS. Attending NYLS was one of the worst financial and emotional experiences of my life. The administration, led at the time by Richard A. Matasar, seemed interested primarily in making money to support their salaries.

    For example, “According to page 18 of New York Law School's 2010 IRS Form 990, Richard Matasar allegedly worked 35 hours per week as dean and "earned" $519,238 in straight salary, i.e. no other compensation. Yes, Matasar made FIVE HUNDRED NINETEEN THOUSAND, TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHT DOLLARS at NYLS in 2009. Matasar also made $495,122 in 2008.”

    The problem here is not the amount of his salary, but they means by which it was obtained. To better understand, think about the Academy Award winning movie “Inside Job”. That move beautifully illustrates how Wall Street masterminded the virtual destruction of our economy. It did so with impunity for one simple reason: it could. Like Wall Street’s pervasive deception of buying “AAA” ratings from Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s to rubberstamp on toxic securities, NYLS seemed to engage in a similar deception. They lure(d) students with seemingly false advertising. For example, they overstate(d) the value of a law degree by falsely stating average starting salary and employment statistics. They paint a very rosy picture for the value of an ultimately worthless piece of paper (e.g. a diploma).

    The deception runs deeper. For example, why did New York Law School have so much money indirectly invested with Bernie Madoff? Seeking a quick dollar it seems, and with whose money? Playing high stakes poker with students’ tuitions is bad move. Unethical arguably. So money seems to be the name of the game at NYLS, not students’ livelihoods. Richard Matasar seemed to make out well though with about half a million a year in salary from students’ tuitions. And Bernie Madoff made out well too for a while from students’ tuitions. Matassar has taken the proverbial money and run, as he’s skipped dodge for possibly greener ($$$) pastures.

    If NYLS advertising were “honest”, it would say something to this effect: “A law degree from a third-tier law school will ultimately be a complete waste of your time, energy, money and livelihood. The legal market is grossly oversaturated. A law degree will likely hurt, not help your employment prospects. No employer wants to hire a lawyer for a menial job. Unless you go to a top 10 ranked law school, and graduate in the top of your class, you’ll be hurting, not helping yourself by attending our institution. So save your time, money and happiness. Do something else with your life.”

    But selling an illusion, a false hope, to naive “students” is too lucrative for those propagating the myth. Their livelihoods depend on you being deceived. So the propaganda will continue, and people like Matasar will continue to reap windfalls from such seemingly deceptive practices.

    ReplyDelete
  77. The following is an opinion based on personal experience with NYLS. Attending NYLS was one of the worst financial and emotional experiences of my life. The administration, led at the time by Richard A. Matasar, seemed interested primarily in making money to support their salaries.

    For example, “According to page 18 of New York Law School's 2010 IRS Form 990, Richard Matasar allegedly worked 35 hours per week as dean and "earned" $519,238 in straight salary, i.e. no other compensation. Yes, Matasar made FIVE HUNDRED NINETEEN THOUSAND, TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHT DOLLARS at NYLS in 2009. Matasar also made $495,122 in 2008.”

    The problem here is not the amount of his salary, but they means by which it was obtained. To better understand, think about the Academy Award winning movie “Inside Job”. That move beautifully illustrates how Wall Street masterminded the virtual destruction of our economy. It did so with impunity for one simple reason: it could. Like Wall Street’s pervasive deception of buying “AAA” ratings from Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s to rubberstamp on toxic securities, NYLS seemed to engage in a similar deception. They lure(d) students with seemingly false advertising. For example, they overstate(d) the value of a law degree by falsely stating average starting salary and employment statistics. They paint a very rosy picture for the value of an ultimately worthless piece of paper (e.g. a diploma).

    The deception runs deeper. For example, why did New York Law School have so much money indirectly invested with Bernie Madoff? Seeking a quick dollar it seems, and with whose money? Playing high stakes poker with students’ tuitions is bad move. Unethical arguably. So money seems to be the name of the game at NYLS, not students’ livelihoods. Richard Matasar seemed to make out well though with about half a million a year in salary from students’ tuitions. And Bernie Madoff made out well too for a while from students’ tuitions. Matassar has taken the proverbial money and run, as he’s skipped dodge for possibly greener ($$$) pastures.

    If NYLS advertising were “honest”, it would say something to this effect: “A law degree from a third-tier law school will ultimately be a complete waste of your time, energy, money and livelihood. The legal market is grossly oversaturated. A law degree will likely hurt, not help your employment prospects. No employer wants to hire a lawyer for a menial job. Unless you go to a top 10 ranked law school, and graduate in the top of your class, you’ll be hurting, not helping yourself by attending our institution. So save your time, money and happiness. Do something else with your life.”

    But selling an illusion, a false hope, to naive “students” is too lucrative for those propagating the myth. Their livelihoods depend on you being deceived. So the propaganda will continue, and people like Matasar will continue to reap windfalls from such seemingly deceptive practices.

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