Friday, March 1, 2013

Stacked Excrement Piles: Law School Diploma Mills Rutgers-Camden and Rutgers-Newark to Merge


Two Trash Pits to Merge Together:

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2013/02/rutgers_to_propose_merging_new.html

On February 28, 2013, the Star-Ledger published Kelly Heyboer’s piece, entitled “Rutgers to propose merging Newark and Camden law schools.” Take a look at this opening:

“Nearly 45 years ago, Rutgers University administrators weary of trying to run a law school with two campuses at opposite ends of the state decided to cut their school in half. With great fanfare, the Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden law schools were born. 

Now, almost a half century later, Rutgers wants to bring its two law schools back together. 

Today, Rutgers President Robert Barchi announced a plan to merge Rutgers-Newark School of Law and Rutgers-Camden School of Law into a single entity by the fall of 2014, creating one of the largest law schools in the country. The 1,400-student school would, once again, be called the Rutgers School of Law.

Though university officials are still working out details of how the united institution would be run, the law school will maintain its two existing campuses.” [Emphasis mine]

Why is this a news story, you ask? Yes, two ABA-accredited toilets merging into one gigantic trash heap is not going to change “legal education” - especially when the enrollment will remain roughly the same. Later on, you will see the mindset of the law school swine:

“John Farmer Jr., dean of the Rutgers-Newark law school, said new technology has helped solve many of the logistical and communication problems that prompted Rutgers to split the two schools in 1967.

In recent years, law school enrollment has been declining nationwide due, in part, to the lack of jobs and the nation’s economic woes. Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden often compete for the same students, faculty and resources. 

"Does it really make sense for us to be competing against each other?" Farmer asked.” [Emphasis mine]

For $ome rea$on, Pig Farmer does not recognize that new technology removes the need for enormous, expensive law libraries. We are in the digital age, Ass-Clown!

Old Proposed Merger Between RuTTgers-Camden and Rowan University:

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/02/proposal_to_merge_2_rutgers_la.html

Back on February 8, 2012, Nic Corbett’s article, entitled “Rowan merger plan complicates proposal to merge 2 Rutgers law schools,” appeared in the Star-Ledger. From the opening:

“It wasn't exactly the merger they had in mind.

Faculty at Rutgers University's law schools in Camden and Newark have been talking about becoming one institution, but that concept has now been complicated by a proposed takeover of the Rutgers-Camden campus by Rowan University.

In a letter to the Rutgers president last week, Camden law school instructors said they recently met to discuss the next steps toward increased cooperation between the two schools. The ultimate goal would be to create "Rutgers Law," which would have a presence in New Brunswick — the university’s largest campus — and raise the national stature of Rutgers' legal education.” 

These profitable business enterprises - masquerading as non-profit “in$titution$ of higher learning” - realize that name brand matters to applicants. Rutgers is a known commodity, even though it is seen as a middling school. In the end, the law schools care about one thing: money!

As TTTT dean John O’Brien, of New England Law Sewer, told the Oregonian, back on August 4, 2012: “It's not the ABA's job to police the number of law schools," O'Brien said. "Law schools are like other businesses. Ultimately, that's what they are.”

Rowan's Impact on RuTTgers-Camden SOL:

Newsworks New Jersey published a June 20, 2012 story from Elizabeth Fiedler, under the headline “Uncertainty hurts numbers for Rutgers-Camden law and business schools.” Check out this revealing excerpt:

http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local//new-jersey/40311-uncertainty-hurts-numbers-for-rutgers-camden-law-and-business-schools

 “The proposed merger of Rutgers-Camden and Rowan University has been making headlines for months.

While the plan is still evolving, all that publicity is giving some prospective students second thoughts. 

Rutgers-Camden School of Law Dean Rayman Solomon said the uncertainty about the merger has hurt the school.

"Applications are down 27 percent which is more than the national average which is 15 percent to 16 percent," said Solomon. "Those who have deposited and committed to coming is down over last year by over 50 percent. However last year was the largest enrollment we'd ever had and this is an ongoing process, so you're comparing last year's final with this on a rolling basis."

Solomon said students have said they like the Rutgers-Camden program but have decided to go elsewhere because they're unsure of the school's fate.” [Emphasis mine]

Again, the academic thieves know the score in this game. Their ultimate goal is to make boatloads of money - at the expense of YOUR future, financial health, and family. You, the student, are merely a means to an end.

Conclusion: In the final analysis, the the sewer rats will continue to financially ass-rape tons of students. This is a mere name change, which is designed to maintain the school’s name brand. This gesture will not help current students or recent graduates of these two piles of waste. According to Economic Modeling Specialists Inc., the state of New Jersey has the THIRD LARGEST GLUT OF ATTORNEYS, in the entire nation!! Only New York and California have more oversaturated lawyer job markets. How do you like those odds, Lemming?!?! 

53 comments:

  1. There really shouldn't be a law school in New Jersey. If The Garden State is such a glutted legal market, where will the excess lawyers go? The top New York firms--and, to a lesser extent, their counterparts in Philadelphia--cast nationwide nets to get young, talented attorneys. Why would they hire someone from either of the Rutgers law schools, or from Seton Hall or any other law school in New Jersey, when they can hire someone from, say, Yale?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good job, Nando. As a NJ taxpayer, I can't tell you how galling it is to subsidize producing unneeded lawyers. BTW, they're about 20 years too late to "raise the national stature of Rutgers' legal education." The jobs a typical Rutgers graduate would take are either being relocated or eliminated by the same technology Farmer espouses, and the remainder are crumbs that often go to graduates of better schools.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The first two commenters get it. 99% of the graduates of NJ law schools aren't even in the running for NYC biglaw. (The ones that are can thank their parents or they look like George Clooney).

    These boys and girls are competing for shitlaw and doc review. And shitlaw is glutted especially in the tri state area. If you throw a fucking rock in the air you'd hit 5 lawyers over here. Doc review is going bye bye. And it was always a crap shoot to begin with. You've all heard the stories of cockroaches in basements. No windows. Docked pay for having the audacity to take a piss or a shit during working hours. Shitty ass depressing lunch break rooms. Horrible bosses. Projects lasting 2 weeks. Or projects being cut at the last second. Falling wages. No health care. Need I go on? Now maybe if you speak Cantonese or German you might get a job. But who wants to work in those shitty conditions?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Tch-tch, Nando is really getting desperate if he's criticizing RUTGERS Law School. This fine institution of higher learning has produced Senators and Harvard law professors, like famed Native American trailblazer Elizabeth Warren. First Native American woman elected to the Senate ever, woooooo!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. 1,400 students...?!?!

    Why, God...? WHHHHYYYYYYYY...?!?!....

    ReplyDelete
  6. Funny as it sounds, plenty of senators have JDs from TTTs. A lot of them don't bother taking the bar either, like southern racist Democrat Robert Byrd. But they usually have money or access to money and the right people. Failing that, sometimes a TTTer can fall back on his or her great people skills.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't forget law school faculties. From what I've heard, you can't walk down the hall at HLS without running into at least a dozen profs who graduated from Rutgers.

      Delete
  7. Gee. The last Campos post was like the last episode of Seinfeld or the last Episode of MASH, but nobody knew it was coming.

    The whole town is desolate. All the cars have the left rear wheel black as a mourning wreath and there’s a persistent wail all night along the North Shore.

    Goodbye Hawkeye!

    ReplyDelete
  8. No — Campos turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Campos, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams....

    ReplyDelete
  9. My cousin got a law degree in 2008. Guess what he does for a living? He sells insurance. On the weekends delivers fucking pizzas! Last I heard, he made more doing that than his day job. I kid you not. When I told him I was considering law school, he came at me like he was gonna pull a knife on me or cave my head in. I see 22 year olds that make more money than him. It's sad what higher ed has become.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Selling Insurance is a catch 22. Great benefits, including health insurance, and low base pay, plus commissions.

    So the pressure is on to sell, and one will be inundated with Zig Zigler and Tony Robbins courses and all of the Psycho get your head right retraining that the, say, Insurance and Financial Services industry will place upon the "account executive" or the "producer" or "account manager" or "marketing manager" etc. etc.

    It is all a matter of semantics, and the last thing they want to call it is SALES which is what it really is.

    Most of all, after you burn up your network of friends and family to sell to, you might be shitcanned by the company and/or given the tap on the shoulder and escorted out of the office without warning.

    I worked in a telemarketing place after law school and it was brutal.

    A senior attorney I worked with used to secretly mock and laugh at the sales people, that came and went over time, and I never thought that that was very nice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So you're better off being a pizza delivery boy than selling insurance?

      Delete
  11. Nando, you don't get the logistics of collapse; when the two schools were cut apart, THAT was when everything was rosy. Now that the field is drying up, the two schools will pull reverse asexual reproduction and become one. Then that conjoined school will start shedding positions, then departments, then one branch will be declared the "weaker" and closed, but within two years it will become obvious that the "main" branch is rotten too, and Rutgers loses it's lawl skool completely. At the rate things are going, everything I said will happen will be done in five to ten years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fifteen or twenty at the most, unless the lawyers stage a revolution and make the country lawyer-centric.

      Delete
  12. Merging both Rutgers' law schools is just another band aid solution to the cancerous tumor that has metastasized. Deans Farmer and Solomon are charlatans or carnival barkers in suits trying to save their cushy jobs. As a NJ taxpayer, I refuse to be part of this smoke and mirrors scheme that absolutely does nothing for the current glut of attorneys in NJ or the poor employment prospects which grads will face when they graduate. Rutgers law school has old faculty (e.g., Askin, Simmons, the guy who teaches cutting edge subjects like "Animal Law," etc.) who want to ride the gravy train to their graves. Many Rutgers law grads will be fucked in this deplorable legal economy as they cannot compete with Harvard, Yale, Columbia, NYU and UPenn. If you are lucky, maybe you can land a traffic court clerkship or do slip and fall cases for a grand a pop (nuisance settlements). Didn't Dean Farmer pen an article about how Biglaw should cut salaries and hire more associates. How out of touch with reality is this assclown that he believes Biglaw will care about low enrollment at commodes such as Rutgers. I realize if you are a woman, you are better off getting the MRS degree at SHittin Hall Law school than at Rutgers, the electric bugaloo law school. And what about Dean Solomon, who was exposed by Prof. Campos as a disingenuous used car salesman. Uniting these schools is like stacking shit. In the end, it's just a tall pile of festering feces.

    ReplyDelete
  13. In the past six months I have met a JD that sold replacement windows and vinyl siding, and another JD that sold life insurance for Afflak.

    If you go to careerbuilder.com and enter the search word "sales" you will see many jobs, and many of them are for large insurance companies.

    The base salary to start is generally between 35K and 40K but the benefits package is generally very good.

    Supplementing the income by delivering pizzas is a great idea, as is bartending at night, which I remember one insurance broker I met used to do.

    I recall someone that made a very good living selling for Allstate and with his own agency.

    Being bilingual is a big plus for getting an insurance sales job.

    I almost landed a job selling for a lumber company at the counter, and with the JD off the resume, but lost out to another person that had more specific experience in that area.

    I recall a telemarketer that quit and found a job with Geico, and he later sold me an auto policy.

    A few years later, I tried to get a sales job with Geico, and actually received an email in reply which said thank you very much and don't apply to Geico again for one year.

    Some years ago, when I was trying to get a job in a law office I spoke with a Sr. Partner of a law firm and family business acquaintence and friend, he told me that there were a lot of hot shots running around from good law schools and with good grades, and that my best chance was to try and convince a law firm that I had a lot of connections and contacts and could bring in some good clients.

    In the telemarketing place I worked in, a kindly manager used to tell me about how she would "buff and tuck" the dejected sales staff that were mentally beat up after being on the phones all day.

    I remember one guy that snapped one day after two years of telemarketing, and started saying obscene things to the people he was talking to on the phone.

    Another nice old woman was given the tap on the shoulder and escorted out of the office on the spot after two weeks of not selling anything.

    Another young sales woman broke out in tears in the elevator from the job and walked out and quit.

    The manager of the telemarketing place used to snap his fingers and holler: "There are calls in que. Why isn't anyone pickign up the phones?"

    Meaning the inbound calls.

    That manager used to have the shit bawled out of him by the Executive VP which would make him red as a beet in the face during the bawl out sessions if the weekly sales for the division weren't enough, and he eventually quit and got a job as a manager for dial a mattress.

    We had lunch at Hooters one day and he explained to me that he couldn't take the stress of the absolute fury of the Executive VP, which I witnessed sometimes and yeah the VP used to fly into an absolute rage in an instant and without warning, and then could be seen giggling a few minutes later.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "If you go to careerbuilder.com and enter the search word "sales" you will see many jobs, and many of them are for large insurance companies.

      The base salary to start is generally between 35K and 40K but the benefits package is generally very good."

      It's also a scam. Insurance companies figure that just about anybody can get a couple of dozen accounts between friends and family, so they are happy to "hire" you. Most people aren't capable of selling to people they don't already know, so then the insurance company "fires" you, and hangs onto the couple of dozen accounts you brought in. It is quite lucrative for them.

      Delete
  14. "Applications are down 27 percent....Those who have deposited and committed to coming is down over last year by over 50 percent." --Dean Solomon

    Right now, scam defenders are breathing a sigh of relief over a tiny monthly uptick in law school applicants. If trends continue, there should be about 55,000 applicants, which is a 15% decline over last year, rather than the 20% decline that was anticipated earlier.

    But a law school application and acceptance is still a preliminary stage on the road to ruin...the kids have not sent in their deposit or committed to attending.

    It is my hope that the kids will either reconsider at the last moment, or at least set up scholarship bidding wars among the schools that accept them. Judging by the 50%(!) decline over last year in kids committing to attend Rutgers-Camden, I have still have hopes that we won't have to wait until 2014 to see some law schools go into a downsizing panic as a preliminary to closure.

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  15. So one law skool split into two shit stacks a long time ago and now the two shit stacks combine to become one giant shit pile. How nice.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Reminds me of when Chrysler recently filed for bankruptcy and was given a government bailout. They closed half their dealerships and called it consolidation which was just another way of saying their cars are chintzy pieces of crap and still are rated the worst cars by Consumer Guide. Same with Rutgers, they are like Chrysler and consolidating due to an inferior and substandard product. Speaking of consumers.....Nando should actually submit comments about these law schools to.a popular consumer watchdog site called RIP OFF REPORT. The site trashed for profit colleges...why not the same for law schools.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Nando:

    Are you going to link up to the outsidethelawschoolscam blog?

    ReplyDelete
  18. http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/27/the-lawyer-surplus-state-by-state/

    On June 27, 2011, Catherine Rampell reported on EMSI’s findings for the New York Times Economix blog. Her article was entitled “The Lawyer Surplus, State by State.” Read the following portion:

    “In raw numbers, New York has the greatest legal surplus by far.

    In 2009, 9,787 people passed the bar exam in the Empire State. The analysts estimated, though, that New York would need only 2,100 new lawyers each year through 2015. That means that if New York keeps minting new lawyers apace, it will continue having an annual surplus of 7,687 lawyers.

    California and New Jersey have the next largest gluts of new lawyers, according to EMSI.”

    Here are the numbers for the state of New Jersey:

    Estimated Annual Openings, for 2010-2015: 844
    Bar Exam Passers in 2009: 3,037
    Surplus: 2,193

    Let’s put this into perspective: the state received 3.60 new lawyers for every estimated attorney job opening, in 2009. Do you see how that *might possibly* impact recent law grads and freshly-minted New Jersey attorneys?!?!

    http://law-school.findthebest.com/d/d/New-Jersey

    Keep in mind that there are currently only three law schools in the state. With this merger, there will be only two ABA-accredited commodes. Of course, the overall enrollment will remain unchanged - other than by fewer applicants causing the toilets to decrease their class sizes.

    According to this source - using a metric labeled Smart Rank - Seton Hall is rated 77th best in the nation, while Rutgers-Newark is ranked 81st and Rutgers-Camden comes in at 98th greatest law school in the United States. You can also take a look at the outrageous sums of tuition that these trash pits charge their victims.

    @ 4:23 am,

    I added Outside the Law School Scam to my blogroll this morning, after seeing your comment and visiting the site. I recall that someone using that screen name posted on the final ITLSS entry. However, the hyperlink did not lead to a website. I initially figured that it was someone playing a game. Apparently, the site will rely on several contributors. Hopefully, some old scam-bloggers will provide an occasional post on that page. Thank you, for the suggestion.

    ReplyDelete
  19. http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/law-rankings/page+3

    According to the latest rankings from US “News” & World Report, $eTTon Haul Univer$iTTy Sewer of Law is listed as the 69th greatest, most amazing law school in the entire land. In fact, it shares this distinction with the following six commodes: Cincinnati, Denver, University of Miami, New Mexico, PiTTsburgh, and Tennessee-Knoxville.

    http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/law-rankings/page+4

    USN&WR ranks RuTTger$-Newark as the 82nd most phenomenal and spectacular law school in the U.S., while RuTTger$-Camden was rated the 99th most prestigious and wondrous commode in the nation.

    By the way, 82 was also a popular number for Bob Morse. The Newark branch was also in a seven-way for that particular ranking. Catholic University of America, Michigan State, Seattle University, SUNY Buffalo, Oklahoma and Oregon were also recognized as featuring the 82nd best law school, by this TTT publication.

    What mesmerizing “ins$TTiTTuTTion$ of higher education,” huh?!?! I remember when L4L mentioned on “Big Debt, Small Law” that one particular biglaw firm, located literally across the street from Seton Hall University Sewer of Law, would not even bother sending a representative to the commode’s OCI. That should tell you a lot, about how these toilets are perceived by legal employers in the state.

    Evidently, many grads from surrounding states take and pass the New Jersey bar exam. Why would New Jersey biglaw employers hire TT grads from Seton Haul, RuTTgers-Newark or RuTTgers-Camden, when they can choose from attorneys who went to much better law schools?

    Remember, law is a highly-stratified “profession.” Partners and clients prefer to hire lawyers with name-brand academic credentials. If you are not in that stratosphere, but you find a legal job, then you will likely end up working in toilet law, where you can represent low-income drug addicts, deadbeats, and bums. In essence, you get to be a social worker who is held to higher ethical standards - without the benefit of a steady paycheck and benefits.

    In that scenario, you will need to hustle to attract business and make a living. You should have EXCELLENT sales ability, if you plan to enter this gutter “profession.” Can you see yourself competing with established, well-known, local ambulance chasers and criminal defense lawyers?!?! Plus, you will occasionally need to track down clients for unpaid legal fees. Why in the hell would any sane person choose to incur an additional $100K+ for a chance to practice toilet law?!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Seton Hall's reputation (except for some ignorant 0l's) has long since been annihilated, this is just putting the nail into the coffin of NJ law schools. When I was a 0L, someone tried to recruit me to Seton Hall by claiming that NJ law schools give you access to "Wall Street Money". LOL.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Learning to supposedly "think like a lawyer" sounds great, but it doesn't always pay the dire and immediate bills.

    Here are some video scenes from my very first job after law school:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zzuCGiaGkM&feature=youtu.be

    The painters from Honduras used to call me "Chilito"

    We used to joke about the paint being chocolate colored and therefore delicious :)

    Hence the joke.

    Catraicho, Guanaco, Chapin, Mexicano and from other Latino countries.

    I have met them all thru the painting trade on Long Island, and after going through the wringer of the law school scam, they restored my faith in humanity and the human spirit.

    The Painter Pest

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I figured they would call you "Senor Cucaracha de la Pintura."

      What would happen to your "faith in humanity" if you got a government job and had your loans discharged? Hmm? It'd certainly add to mine a bit if you did.

      Delete
    2. It's so easy to get a gubment job these days.

      Delete
    3. Yeah, I know, there are so few overpaid and incompetent government employees these days, NOT!

      I'll bet there are janitor jobs available, except certain pieces of trash think they are too good for such work, and would rather sponge off of their parents until they're fucking 100.

      Delete
  22. I took a little steam out of 1044 it seems.

    dont worry we will find out who you are you anon gutless chicken, too stupid to realize that chilito means little penis.

    And so I'd rather be called a roach.

    why dont you have the courage to say who you are and save us the touble?

    You can't go on saying the things you do without explaining your own situation and motives.

    The folding of the Campos regime is irrelevant.

    And besides, all Campos did was invite a general gripe and a host of anon demons and devils and in the end Campos probably figured that blogging was not mentally healthy for himself as well.

    Especially with cowardly anon stalkers like you around.

    Just come out of the closet and say who the fuck you are and I will have a lot more respect for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL, threats from a roach.

      Speaking of stalkers, why are you always demanding that everyone give you four forms of ID? Do you want to, like, break into my house one night and climb into bed with me?

      Or what?

      Delete
    2. "Do you want to, like, break into my house one night and climb into bed with me?"

      He probably does. He is lonely. It sounds like you want a little company too.

      Delete
    3. If I did, I would probably just give him my name and street address.

      Delete
  23. 1044 likes the closet. He ain't coming out of there. It suits his lifestyle better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Riiiight. And where is YOUR distinct identity kit, little girl? Post it immediately!

      Delete
  24. The job market for lawyers is shit. Why anyone not hired by the law schools would defend this shit industry is beyond me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To defend law schools with their add-raping of naive idealistic students would be like to defend Penn States cover up of the Jerry Sandinsky molestations. Another thing you you should research. Google "NALP BEST PRACTICE CAREER. SERVICES" and notice how it clearly says that law schools must make reasonable efforts to locate missing alumni and determine if they are employed and assist them. Yet the law schools have all these missing alumni and they act like they were abducted by UFOS. You telling me they really made an effort to locate them. More like they ignored them intentionally because they are afraid to discover they are unemployed. I am sure if these lost alumni won.the lottery the law school President would conveniently know where they are located and ask for a donation the next day.

      Delete
  25. I don't know,

    The inappropriate Mr. Infinity boner doesn't even know the proper time and place to pop a boner, and he has a hard on for and hates the scamblogs, but reads them obsessively.

    There are human beings, and also human boners.

    Please Mr. Infinity, tuck that ugly boner (meaning your face) away and get out of here!

    You are offending the ladies!

    ReplyDelete
  26. This thread illustrates one aspect of the law school scam not often discussed--unless you are lucky enough to get a (very competetive) job with a government agency, law practice is a matter of sales. In any private practice--big firm, small firm, solo--ability to practice law matters much less than the ability to "bring in business." Many people are not suited to this, and want a job where they can go in the office in the morning, do their job well during the day, and leave at night, without worrying about networking or convincing people to buy a service they aren't interested in. Such people will not do well in private practice, and should be told so.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Law is a shit profession. Even if you are lucky enough to get into biglaw, you're being paid to fuck over the working man. You'll make good money (until the partners decide you're expendable after a few years). But you are making a pittance compared to the cocksucking biglaw partners. That's why so many bright, intelligent biglaw associates voluntarily leave those good paying jobs after a few years.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Just came across this article over morning coffee:

    http://www.buffalonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130303/BUSINESS/130309740/1005

    The kid being profiled in the article received an MBA/JD from some shitstacked school in Buffalo and managed to land a job at a shitlaw firm. I read this kid's linkedin profile:

    http://www.linkedin.com/pub/brian-sadonis/1a/826/7a6

    Let's see, an overhyped and obscenely expensive BA from NYU and an MBA/JD from Buffalo. I bet this kids thought he was going to land a gig at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, not Gibson, McAskill whatever, whatever in Buffalo, NY.

    Nando, what's up with this kid? The article says he works at a firm but the firm's website doesn't list him as an attorney and his employer is not listed in his linkedin profile:

    http://www.gmclaw.com/attorneys.html

    When you read the article, several things stand out. First, the stock library picture of the law firm is so antiquated. Modern firms don't have a physical library--they use electronic research resources. In fact a physical library is a waste of space and very pretentious these days. Secondly, the kid needs to buy his own shirts and stop wearing his dad's long sleeve shirts, which exceed his jacket cuff line by about 3 inches. No one actually wears a suit jacket when they are working in the office. I bet this kids is making about $40-50K a year. If he paid sticker to go to NYU and Buffalo law, his debt burden is likely over $150K. And this is supposed to be a "success" story? Lemmings must love getting fucked.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Actually, I remember that 30 years ago one of thse Rutgers schools actually had a decent reputation. The other one did not. I applied to the good one not just as a "safe" school, but since I had a Jersey address, which would have given me a very low tuition. I was actually wait listed at it, while other schools like BU and NYU accepted me. If that is still the case, then too bad for those graduates, not being linked to the cesspit that is the other one.

    Of course, in today's environment, it probably doesn't matter much anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  30. http://articles.philly.com/2013-03-01/news/37354760_1_rayman-solomon-law-schools-associate-dean

    On March 1, 2013, the Philadelphia Inquirer published a piece from reported Jonathan Lai, under the headline “Rutgers explores merging Camden and Newark law schools.” Take a look at the following excerpt, from that article:

    “Rutgers University is exploring a plan to merge its two law schools by 2014, president Robert L. Barchi announced Thursday at a board of governors meeting.

    The separately accredited schools in Newark and Camden would combine under one Rutgers banner, with a single faculty, student body, and admissions process. Faculties at both schools voted unanimously in late January to support the idea.

    "I strongly and heartily support to move forward with a concept that would bring the law schools at Rutgers together," Barchi told the board Thursday.

    At a time when legal education is in a national spotlight because of rising costs and tightening job opportunities, deans of the schools said the move could help Rutgers strengthen its brand and expand its reach.

    A merger could become "a solution that can really enable us to make law school more affordable, more accessible, and will enhance the job opportunities for our graduates to have both the New York and Philadelphia markets and together with the whole East Coast," said Rayman Solomon, dean of the School of Law in Camden.

    Pooled resources could lower tuitions or increase scholarship funding, said John J. Farmer Jr., dean of the School of Law in Newark.”

    As you can see, the pigs are PRIMARILY concerned with funding. Keep in mind that these supposed “non-profit institutions of higher learning” are committed to sucking on the federal student loan teat, for as long as possible. In the end, these bastards and bitches have no skin in the game. They are guaranteed to receive overpaid salaries, regardless of the job prospects facing their graduates. If you want to personally contribute to these cockroaches’ inflated incomes – by going into SERIOUS financial debt – then go ahead. No one can stop you from ruining your future, if you are truly committed to wrecking your life - for a law degree.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just in the news that a 32 year old lawyer from Philadelphia was so distraught over student loans that he murdered his mother before killing himself

      Delete
  31. You are hilarious! And as a UH law student, I know you are speaking nothing but the truth about all of these diploma mills. Love your blog, please don't ever stop doing this.

    ReplyDelete
  32. @ 8:39PM...do you have the article for that? lol

    Second of all,...these schools are combining together because they know it is immenent that either one or the two was going to go bad like in Vermont and to save face for starters, they combined together.

    Combing will cut tuition or increase scholarships? I HIGHLY DOUBT IT...yeah, they will probably increase scholarships but make it impossible to keep it, so either way, it'll be a win-win situation for them...

    ReplyDelete
  33. In all seriousness no one should go to law school unless their family is rich or they got into Yale, Harvard or Stanford. Everything else can fuck off.

    ReplyDelete
  34. It may be that even with the public shaming that's going on, no law schools are going to close. Why? The winning combination of the gullible and loans-unless the federal loan hydrant is shut down, this scam will continue in perpetuity. Look at the for-profit colleges-roundly derided in the media, thoroughly discredited, yet still alive and kicking because of gullible applicants(there is apparently no shortage of these) and federal loan money(no shortage of that, either).
    So next step: stop the federal money which is, in reality, forcing whole generations of law scamees into a lifetime of marginal living.

    ReplyDelete
  35. This power play could be best viewed in terms of military strategy actually. You see, the pigs know enrollment is down at these two trash heaps and standing on their own they will soon fold. So they are consolidating in a last-ditch effort to get all the money into one pool. I can almost see the pigs standing around the trough lapping it up in a frenzy as the feed lot continues to shrink.

    What's funny is that these refined, so-called "academics" at Rutgers will now turn on each other fighting for dean positions and other posts with juicy salaries now that there will be one school. Can't have two head deans of one law school. They should have a UFC-style tournamet among the pigs to see who gets to keep their job at this special new law school.

    Fuck 'em.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Wow, so this is where the bitter, failed D students hang out. Should've hit the books mroe and stayed away from the bars and the video games.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, Bitch.

      If someone earned a D in a class, then they did not fail the course, Idiot. Learn how to spell, by the way. I recognize that the word "more" is difficult for someone of your "intelligence" level to grasp, but you need to expand your mind, cockroach.

      You are dismissed.

      Delete
  37. H8ers gonna H8. RCLS grad, 7 years out, and I have no complaints about the place. Glad I went and would do it again if I could (and I was a median GPA guy).

    ReplyDelete

 
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