Tuesday, January 27, 2015

The End Result of Law School Diploma Mills Lowering Their Admi$$ion$ “Standards”


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/law-schools-are-admitting-students-they-would-have-rejected-years-ago/

Excellent News: On January 21, 2015, CBS Moneywatch featured a Jonathan Berr piece headlined “Are law school admission standards slipping?” Look at the portion below:

"Not all law schools are lowering admission standards," wrote Wendy Margolis of the Law School Admissions Council in an email. "If some of them are, you would need to ask them about their individual reasons. Actually, enrollment did not start to really decline until after the recovery began. There was a lag. We really have no way of knowing what will happen in the future." 

In an interview, Organ said his colleagues at other schools have noticed a decline in the quality of their students, though he hasn't noticed it at his university, which is in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

"It is a refrain that I hear with some frequency," he said. "The quality of students isn't what it was two or three years ago." 

About 30,000 to 38,000 people entered the legal job market annually between 1982 and 2012, according to Organ's analysis. Another 7,000 to 18,000 departed the legal job market during that same period. The numbers of departures is expected to increase in coming years, while entrants are forecast to drop.” [Emphasis mine]

For $ome rea$on, these sick bitches and hags are okay with admitting mouthbreathing morons and ass-wipes. After all, student loan conduits only require a pulse, and a modicum of intelligence. Yes, these “educators” truly are beacons of integrity, huh?!?! 

Now, scroll down to this apt and concise conclusion:

“Still, while it's now easier to get into law school than it has been, the chances of ultimately succeeding as practicing lawyers for those who wouldn't have made the cut earlier are only shrinking.”

Do you understand that, Lemming – or do I need to draw you a diagram with Crayola on posterboard?!?! When is this information going to penetrate your gray matter? 

http://www.jdjournal.com/2015/01/22/many-law-schools-lowering-admissions-requirements/?hvid=4JPL9X

Other Coverage: On January 22, 2015, JD Journal published a Noelle Price article entitled “Law Schools Nationwide Lowering Admissions Requirements.” Check out this opening:

Summary: Although it may now be easier to get accepted to law school, many students will be grossly unprepared and unable to pass the state bar exam. 

According to CBS, it’s getting easier and easier to get into law school. This is especially good news when paired with the improvement of the legal job market. 

Unfortunately, many students who are admitted to law school under reduced admission requirements may not be able to pass the bar exam. They will incur a massive amount of debt during law school, but may be unable to ever add “Esquire” to the end of their names. 

Jerome Organ, a professor at the [Third Tier] University of St. Thomas, has studied admission requirements intently. According to a recent analysis, 33 percent of entering law school students had median LSAT scores of 160 or higher in 2013. In 2010, 40.8 percent had a 160 or above. LSAT scores range from 120 to 180. First-year law students with scores of 149 or under increased from 14.2 percent to 22.5 percent. According to the New York Times, schools are competing for students with the best credentials.” [Emphasis mine]

Hell, it seems that anyone with an IQ approaching room temperate can gain entry into at least one ABA-accredited toilet. Imagine if you could say the same thing about your personal physician. Then again, at least those enrolled in medical school actually learn how to do their job thoroughly, due to labs, rotations, residencies, etc. In stark contrast, “legal educators” fill you with archaic, abstract notions. They pump and dump you, and move onto the next batch of victims.

Conclusion: It is much better to be weeded out of the field BEFORE incurring an additional $120K+ in NON-DISCHARGEABLE debt. What the hell is the point of taking on insane amounts of debt for a chance to enter a GLUTTED field, where a few make big salaries but most earn between $40K-$55K upon graduation?!?!  Do you care more about your ego than your financial well-being?  Real professional schools do not admit applicants with weak-ass entrance test scores or barely competent academic credentials. Medical, dental and veterinary schools have historically done a good job of limiting the number of slots to match the projected number of job openings in that field. I recognize that medical and dental schools are now producing excess numbers of doctors and dentists. However, at least they are not collectively pumping out the equivalent of 46,776 graduates annually - for a total 28,746 positions where “bar passage is required.” 

The fact remains that true professional degree programs seek to protect the investment – in time, money and energy – of those working in their specific field, including future practitioners. You also don’t see med schools telling their students that they can do anything with a medical degree. They also do not place their recent grads in school-funded, temporary positions or count those working at Starbucks as “employed.” Plus, you need to major in something more substantive than Political “Science” or History, in order to be considered a viable candidate. In the end, “law professors” and administrators only care about lining their own pockets. If they end up FINANCIALLY RUINING legions of young people – and bilking the taxpayer – in the process, then that is fine with them. These cockroaches will not lose a wink of sleep over their actions.

47 comments:

  1. I can only hope that when the bubble pops, these "professors" and especially "administrators" have to find a non-legal job or get no job at all. They will not be able to handle a full time job that requires summer work anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Warning: Abysmal salary. Baby sitters and cleaners are making $15 in this part of NJ. At least they don t have debts to repay. In Basking Ridge, one hour from Manhattan, the cost of living is very high. $500,000.00 for a small 3 bed house but the salary for a lawyer $15/$25.

    Attorney Needed (Basking Ridge, NJ)
    On Craigslist JAN 23

    compensation:
    NJ Licensed Attorney Needed
    Court paperwork, Interrogatories, etc.
    $15 per hour office time, minus lunch
    $25 per hour court time, including driving time back and forth to court
    Part Time/Temp Work

    ReplyDelete
  3. The other difference between law school and medical/dental schools is that law schools have been pumping out excessive numbers of graduates for the past 20-30 years, and these numbers were actually accelerating in more recent years before the "scam" became known.

    Much of this is because of the cost of educating a doctor/dentist, verses the cost of educating a lawyer. I once read that for every $1 in tuition a medical student pays, the government pays $2 (via subsidies) towards the education of that doctor. Thus, medical schools (and presumably dental schools) run at a loss, and are dependent on government funding from sources in addition to student loans to stay open. By contrast, law schools (and business schools) are revenue generators for the university, since they don't require so much money to operate.

    Of course, the joke in all this is that to truly educate a lawyer to really practice law, it really would cost a good deal of money. Classes would need to be much smaller, and there would need to be all sorts of staff hired to train the student to write, speak, argue and think the way a true lawyer should. This, of course, would cut into profits, so we have the much more economical "Socratic method" style pedagogy.

    I should also point out, that although the American Medical Association has kept the number of medical schools steady at 150, they have been circumvented by the Osteopathic schools AND the numerous Nurse Practitioner programs. Thus, unless there is a reverse course, Medicine is about 10-20 away from where law is now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My wife is in the healthcare field and I've noticed a couple of things. First her degree is much more versatile than my law degree. She and her coworkers not only work as practitioners but they get job offers to manage in the healthcare field, sell equipment or analyze data or audit sites for drug testing companies.

      The second thing I've noticed is that any time they want to work, they can. If my wife wants some extra $$$ she just calls the office and asks for patients. Nurses sign up for extra shifts. It's crazy. Lawyers spend thousands of $$$ on ads, networking lunches, charitable contribution, civic clubs just to have a chance at getting to work. It's soooooo stupid.

      Delete
    2. No question healthcare is a better field.

      I've noticed similar stuff with my doctor friends. Each time they want more money, they just take-on a new job. And, up 'till now anyway, there is always someone somewhere who will hire them.

      The law degree is absolutely useless these days for two reasons: (1) it doesn't teach you anything of merit, other than how to analyze case law, and (2) there are way too many people with a JD.

      We were all duped!

      Delete
    3. #2 is really the biggest problem. That and the fact that for medicine there is matching, so everyone gets training. Actually a medical school grad without a residency match is even more worthless than a law grad. But since the numbers generally work out, it's not an issue.

      Law makes no attempt to limit numbers to anything reasonable. And when the numbers aren't reasonable, employers will not train and will not pay.

      So a lot of law grads never even get on the ladder in the first place. It's impossible to work your way up if you never get on the ladder, or the ladder you're on is missing a large amount of stepholds above you.

      Flood any profession with candidates, no matter what that job entails, and the profession becomes worthless. Dentistry had a similar issue a few decades ago. And the trades used to have that issue as well.

      Law is just even more scummy than anything else previously because education is something society brainwashes people into going after, from government to parents to everyone else, but then law school is extremely expensive and there is no reason for it to be.

      It could just have been an undergrad degree. At least then, it could indeed be an actually versatile major. It could be like accounting where you have the degree and it lets you start to gain experience, and then you take exams after you have experience to become a CPA. The JD or rather the bar license could have operated the same way.

      This is why the scam is so insidious. There was no reason for it, no reason for the massive costs. A law school costs practically nothing to run. Just large lecture halls and a windbag.

      Delete
    4. The worthlessness of any degree is almost entirely due to an over-saturation in the market. For example, the reason half of all college graduates end up at jobs that do not require a college degree is because there are too many of them.

      In the case of law, you are dealing with people that have spent 7 years in school full-time AND paid in excess of $150K. The fact that now they're unable to practice because there is an over-saturation is just criminal.

      The controversial, conservative commentator Ann Coulter has stated that congress should bring-in presidents of various Universities and have them explain why they charge so much, and what exactly do their graduates do. On this matter, I am in 100% agreement with Ann.

      Note: regarding medical residencies, we're starting to see more and more med school graduates unable to get into them. This is mostly true for FMGs, but the number is likely to increase due to the proliferation of Osteopathic schools (and, possibly, the emergence of NPs, that may be chipping away at some of the jobs clinicians used to do).

      Delete
    5. ^^^ If you were the ONLY art history major in the world, you'd probably make a very good living in the appraisal/auction/consulting racket.

      Delete
    6. "The fact that now they're unable to practice because there is an over-saturation is just criminal."

      And consider, the way for the government to maximize the likelihood of being repaid by existing JD-debtors is to restrict the number of new JD-debtors being created.

      It is unquestionably in the best interests of the federal government to restrict supply.

      So, why doesn't the federal government go after law schools?

      I've got two words for you: corruption. corruption.

      Delete
  4. My spouse is a Harvard Law grad with honors with an equally good undergrad, Article 3 clerkship and years in a top big law firm. Is impossible to get ANY WORK after one has to leave big law. No one is hiring. It has been over a year of total unemployment and futile job applications. The only interview was another less prestigious big law firm that wanted a guarantee of business. The in house jobs do not bite. The law firms all want to hire people who will bring work, not workers, once a lawyer has a little more than 5 years of experience. There is just no demand anywhere even for top law grads. The only saving grace is having years of paying work as a lawyer in the past. Not sure the same would be true for a Harvard Law grad like my spouse who was a more recent grad, but with more than 10 years of experience.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your wife isn't alone.

      I know of two Harvard law graduates that are currently unemployed, and I know of three more that have left the practice of law entirely. The jobs they are doing really aren't anything special, so it seems that impressive Harvard education has gone to waste.

      Delete
    2. My spouse is a he.

      Delete
    3. ^ Only in your dreams, my friend.

      Delete
  5. Nando, I think our experience, that Harvard plus all these honors plus good personality, experience, etc. does not necessarily produce work calls into question whether the top students who get into top law schools and get entry level jobs should be going to law school. The oversaturation is likely to affect many lawyers, whether they go to Harvard or Hofstra. The trouble is likely to come a lot sooner for Hofstra grads. But there is still lots of trouble possible, or maybe even likely, for many of the top students at the top schools, going down the road.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I have said before, even Harvard and Yale are questionable choices for the non-grandees.

      Old Guy

      Delete
    2. The only grandees here are those that produce portable business or who
      Are in the minority that gets and keeps an in house job. Prep schools, society, nothing like that matters. Cold hard cash matters and luck matters for anyone who wants a career with their law degree

      Delete
  6. You could major in basket weaving and get into fucking law school.

    ReplyDelete
  7. My best friend married a Liberian woman who is a licensed nurse practitioner. She earns a solid six figure income and drives a 2014 Mercedes S550. From what my buddy tells me, she rotates at different hospitals and medical practices. She is constantly in demand. She obtained her degree in Liberia and has no student loan debt. Contrast that with my friend who finished paying off his law school debt at the age of 52 (and this is someone who attended law school in the early '90s). Guess who the breadwinner is? Hint: it is not the JD holder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that's a high salary for an np; she must specialize. also, it's disturbing there is no barrier for foreign entry. pharmacy was changed by corrupt boards to also bring in foreigners, with 20 percent of the workforce foreign in ten years. now, with mass grad saturation, the visas aren't being issues anymore. food for thought. nps/pas are in good shape now, but that is a bubble waiting to burst.

      Delete
  8. Law schools are now less selective than middle high basketball teams. Congrats.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Do 0L's read this blog? Or just the choir?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many 0L's do, but not enough, unfortunately. Applications continue to drop, but only between 5-10% year over year. It should be more like 10-20%.

      Special Snowflake Syndrome is a harsh mistress, though, and she beguiles the minds of many.

      Delete
    2. Anyone can come across this blog through the miracle of Google. It may be a 0L who needs to decide which schools are decent investments. (Hint: there are fewer than 4 that are worth attending without financial aid, and they all happen to offer need-based financial aid anyway.) It may be a parent wondering whether to support or encourage their child in attending law school. (That is a hugely underserved and unappreciated demographic segment right there. Parents, listen up.) It may be a 1L deciding whether to drop out in spite of the sunk cost fallacy. All told, there are probably a few million people who could benefit from reading this blog, but they'll drop in at their own convenience. We're doing our best to have good answers and insights here in anticipation of that glorious moment.

      Word on the street is that the House and Senate budget committees could benefit from reading this blog as well.

      Delete
  10. Well, as a 37 years-in-practice solo, I could not afford to pay the school debts of one of my children had they gone to law school. The 1L's have NO IDEA the financial ruin they send themselves to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please write a letter to your state supreme court, state bar assn, and local paper stating exactly that.

      Delete
    2. I am working on it.

      Delete
    3. I am working on it.

      Delete
  11. http://energyfanatics.com/2015/01/12/did-you-know-debts-prepaid-fraudulent/

    there is more to the scam of education, there is scam of money which folks need to consider

    ReplyDelete
  12. what so called lenders do not disclose is that "loans"
    are funded by use of negotiable instruments which are derived from personal information and signatures.
    the borrower's information funds the so called loan and the lender asks you to pay them for money they did not loan. they do not disclose this and most will not discuss it
    because it negates their claims of money owed. they assume no risk, hide the fact they offer nothing of value in the transaction.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wow, I knew it was bad, but I didn’t think that Harvard law grads were not getting (or in this case retaining) quality legal employment. The attorney job situation is much more dire than I thought. When I graduated from a good 2nd tier regional school 25 years ago, at least the top half of the class had a decent shot at working in a 25-50 person law firm. There is no way in hell that I would let a child or future grandchild enter this putrid profe$$ion.

    ReplyDelete
  14. The way those numbers look, it ought to be Harvard, Yale and Stanford as a future 1L's choice. Everything else will eventually be a trap school or a flat-out toilet.

    ReplyDelete
  15. When did everyone become hopeful the tide was turning against the schools?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In early 2012, when it started turning so rapidly that no one could ignore it.

      Delete
  16. http://outsidethelawschoolscam.blogspot.com/2014/10/race-to-bottom-which-law-schools-have.html

    Back on October 14, 2014, dybbuk posted an OTLSS article labeled “Race to the Bottom: Which law schools have lowered their admissions standards and by how much?” Focus on the following portion:

    “The sharp decline in applications over the last few years is forcing law schools to tinker with student quality, class size, and tuition while they wait and hope for a revival in demand for their toxic product, the JD. Stated generally, the following strategies are available to law schools:

    Strategy One: Maintain admissions standards-- which almost certainly creates the necessity of reducing class size, cutting tuition, and/or offering more tempting scholarships to attract quality students. It also creates the prospect of a fiscal shortfall that will become more serious over time.

    or

    Strategy Two: Lower admissions standards, with not-so-long-term disastrous implications for the school’s reputation, the profession itself, and for the poorly qualified matriculants, aka lemmings of average and below average intelligence, who are less likely than brainier members of their cohort to bounce back after taking the plunge.

    Of course, these two approaches are not quite mutually exclusive-- a law school can lower admissions standards marginally while simultaneously reducing class size, ect. I imagine Strategy Two as a big barrel (or barros) filled to the brim with intoxicating scam. A law school can abstain, sip lightly, or guzzle with shameless abandon, and the choice it makes says much about its character.”

    This piece contains a chart showing how many ABA-accredited commodes have lowered their “standards” to embarrassing levels. According to that graph, fully 166 trash pits saw a decline in the median GPA for matriculants – from 2011 to 2013. By the way, in that time frame, another 26 schools experienced no change in this metric – while only 6 damn law schools saw an increase of 1 point or more on their entering class median LSAT.

    At this point, if you write “I like lamps” on your law school application Personal Statement, you will be able to gain admi$$ion to a few ABA-approved toilets. Getting into law school now is a lesser accomplishment than hitting 10 straight free throws in your driveway basketball hoop – or beating your 14 year old nephew in a game of chess.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some law skules don't even request a personal statement.

      Old Guy

      Delete
  17. It's clear that the schools will do anything to fill their classes, with ever lower standards. But the Special Snowflakes keep applying, incurring massive debt, and not finding jobs. When will it stop? No ABA approved school has closed yet...

    ReplyDelete
  18. http://insidethelawschoolscam.blogspot.com/2012/12/endgame.html

    Back on December 14, 2012, Paul Campos posted an excellent entry, simply entitled “Endgame.” Look at the portion below:

    “What are the economic implications for law schools of an admissions cycle that ends up attracting only 53,000 applicants? To answer this question, we have to estimate how many matriculants such a cycle is likely to yield. This is a function of two factors: how many applicants end up getting admitted to at least one school to which they apply, and how many admitted applicants actually end up enrolling.

    As to the first factor, the percentage of applicants being admitted to at least one school has been rising for several years now:

    2004: 55.6%
    2005: 58.6%
    2006: 63.1%
    2007: 66.1%
    2008: 66.5%
    2009: 67.4%
    2010: 68.7%
    2011: 71.1%

    In other words, law school applicants were 27.9% more likely to be admitted to at least one school in 2011 than they had been seven years earlier. We don’t have numbers yet for how many 2012 applicants were admitted to at least one school, but since the number of applicants fell by 13.7%, while the number of new 1Ls fell by only 8.6%, it seems certain that the upward trend in percentage of applicants admitted continued.”

    Imagine the acceptance rates at ABA-accredited commodes now, people. Of course, the bitches and hags will act surprised if bar passage rates continue to decline. This is a mere show, i.e. these “educators” do not give a damn what happens to their students upon graduation. Then again, don't be surprised if these pieces of garbage try to influence state bar examiners into making their exams easier.

    ReplyDelete
  19. 2012: 74.9%
    2013: 76.9%
    Source: http://www.lsac.org/lsacresources/data/lsac-volume-summary

    The scariest thing about this all: This increase comes directly from the untouchables being let in by the TTTTs.

    Lemmings, this is for you:
    If this isn't all crystal clear for you by now, the whole bottom-feeder scam is pretty simple. Whereas even the worst-of-the-worst (e.g. Arizona Summit, Charlotte School of Law, Florida Coastal, Cooley, JMLS, TJLS, Touro, Suffolk) formerly had some standards, now there are none.

    There are only two reasons acceptance isn’t 100%: (1) Some 0Ls have enough smarts/pride not to apply to shitholes that give automatic acceptance or (2) the applicant has a record that a $chool can’t plead ignorance about (e.g. a crime-or a similar character and fitness issue-that would disqualify the applicant from bar admission, in violation of ABA Standard 501(b)).

    The only thing that will get you a rejection letter from Cooley: a felony conviction.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Anyone attending law school these days is a certifiable moron. Nando, did you read this alarming article about "legal technicians" replacing lawyers and being able to perform legal services without a law degree or legal licensure?:

    http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/washington_state_moves_around_upl_using_legal_technicians_to_help_close_the?utm_source=UPDATED+LIST&utm_campaign=f97b744c40-February_3rd_2014_Attorney2_7_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a656c7cd19-f97b744c40-407778225

    The end of the profession is already here. Anyone going into debt for a worthless and watered down JD deserves no mercy or sympathy for their stupidity in following this extinct career path.

    ReplyDelete
  21. http://insidethelawschoolscam.blogspot.com/2012/12/endgame.html

    On December 14, 2012, Paul Campos posted an excellent entry, simply entitled “Endgame.” Look at this portion:

    “What are the economic implications for law schools of an admissions cycle that ends up attracting only 53,000 applicants? To answer this question, we have to estimate how many matriculants such a cycle is likely to yield. This is a function of two factors: how many applicants end up getting admitted to at least one school to which they apply, and how many admitted applicants actually end up enrolling.

    As to the first factor, the percentage of applicants being admitted to at least one school has been rising for several years now:

    2004: 55.6%
    2005: 58.6%
    2006: 63.1%
    2007: 66.1%
    2008: 66.5%
    2009: 67.4%
    2010: 68.7%
    2011: 71.1%

    In other words, law school applicants were 27.9% more likely to be admitted to at least one school in 2011 than they had been seven years earlier. We don’t have numbers yet for how many 2012 applicants were admitted to at least one school, but since the number of applicants fell by 13.7%, while the number of new 1Ls fell by only 8.6%, it seems certain that the upward trend in percentage of applicants admitted continued.”

    This was the situation three years ago. Now, SEVERAL ABA-accredited diploma mills that are accepting more than 80 percent of applicants!! Don’t forget that smarter applicants are avoiding law school at a MUCH higher clip than the morons with pathetic LSAT scores.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/04/the-wrong-people-have-stopped-applying-to-law-school/255685/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Look on the bright side. The more egregious the scam, the nastier the blow-back.

      These esteemed legal educational professionals are so intelligent they managed to ruin a really easy scam with their overwhelming greed.

      They are shitting where they eat. How smart is someone who eats shit?

      These law school principals are definitely not smarter than the students they have scammed.
      These 'men' and 'women' have precisely nothing to teach anyone.

      Delete
  22. Does it strike anyone as odd that in this administration's massive expansion of regulations into healthcare, finance, energy, etc, the education racket is the sole field to escape attention. The price of a degree has outpaced everything and yet the gov't turns a blind eye to them. Insidious indeed.

    ReplyDelete
  23. In the Sunday (Peoria, IL) Journal Star 02-01-2015:

    "Illinois Law Master of Studies in Law at the U of I; Legal training for the mid-career professional."

    "Discover how an MSL can help strengthen professional skills in fields such as: HR, compliance, hospital administration, risk management, engineering, journalism, government, and finance."

    "Full and part-time enrollment. Start in the fall or spring semester. Scholarships available. No admissions exam required."

    Truly. "No admissions exam required." To a graduate level program? My memory is a bit thin but as I recall, grade schools and high schools don't have entrance exams, but virtually every other program has SOME requirements, (can draw breath;; doesn't eat with feet, and such) if not some sort of exam.

    As a J.D. holder from U of I, what are MSL holders to do with that degree? Replace corporate attorneys? Have a better awareness of issues to be sent to the company's attorneys?

    Can't fools refer matters to corporate attorneys?

    "Looks 'legal' to me, send it to the attorneys." Does one really need a degree to do that?

    Perhaps I am missing something. Having practiced 38 years, what would I know about a degree from my alma mater lesser than mine?

    (I would note, seriously, that though the general consensus is that law school does not teach much of practical use-it doesn't-but the real and true difference, and the reason conscientious, licensed attorneys have any value at all, and they have much value, is that they have spent a lifetime learning and honing their practical lawyering skills-something MSL degree holders are highly unlikely to do. MSL holders, by definition, have degrees in other fields and job responsibilities largely in other fields, not law.)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Just a quick defense of boomers.

    I received a resume from a recent grad, with a cover letter. The cover letter indicated that "there did not seem to be many entry level jobs" in the area. Hello-yes!

    I called and spoke with the recent grad that day. Offering to meet with the person, to connect them with other attorneys who might have referral or conflict work, and to introduce the person to the legal community. I called a number of attorneys, including those listed as references. I don't have a job for the person, as a 38 year solo, I still try to make a living, day to day and hour by hour, but I am willing to spend 2 or 3 hours to head them in the right direction.

    The person was "not available" that week, but would call the next week. Three weeks have passed and no call.

    Apparently, someone is still feeding this person.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This isn't really much of a defense. It looks like standard boomer fare, insult the younger generations, accuse them of being lazy or entitled etc., while tooting their own horn.

      Dude is probably too busy working crap jobs just to be able to eat, he doesn't have time to be trotted around to be laughed at by some old established farts that have no desire to hire him or pay him anything.

      If all you needed to be able to practice was 2-3 hours nobody would ever need a lawyer. They could just research whatever they need to themselves.

      It takes years to be a qualified attorney. You either need to be employed and have the workflow to learn while making some sort of salary, or you have to be funded so you can just go out there and bungle around for a few years on your own. Either way, it takes more than 2-3 hours.

      I'm sure you know all this. Which makes your post nothing other than what I said it was initially.

      Delete
    2. Can't say as it was a "take your face to the mat and feed you your own feet" defense.

      The "person" has not called back yet as of 2-11-11-15, so clearly, has better things to do than advance person's career.

      I AM too busy working crap jobs, BUT have already expended about an hour ($275) pulling together materials for "Person."

      And was willing to spend another 2-3 hours of my time meeting with the Person and connecting person with the legal community, sources of work, and the Bar Association.

      I calculated recently that in my 38 years of practice I have worked 56.5 YEARS of 2,000 hour years.

      I DO know all of this. You don't. And, you are no match for me.

      Surely, there are playgrounds and 8 year olds in your area where you can seek challenge.

      Delete
  25. what are you so pissed off about? your report of this "scam" is a scam! ....this has just about ALWAYS been the case in most professions. and ok, so now you got your JD and you can't charge 500$ a hour? tough! by the way, my pimp charges me 40$ a session for every blow job I give....if I don't start breaking even and become a porn star like, RIGHT AFTER like the uh, you know, like 2nd month, ILL BE SURE TO PISS AND MOAN ABOUT IT.

    ReplyDelete

 
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