Sunday, February 15, 2015

Toilet Merger: William Mitchell College of Law and Hamline University School of Law to Join Third Tier Forces


http://www.startribune.com/local/291856891.html

One Down: On February 13, 2014, the Star Tribune published a piece from reporter Maura Lerner, under the banner headline “Hamline, William Mitchell law schools to merge.” Check out this epic opening:

“With enrollment in a free-fall nationally, some predicted it was just a matter of time before some American law schools started disappearing. 

Now, Minnesota is dropping from four to three. On Friday, Hamline University and William Mitchell College of Law announced that they are merging their law schools, which have been rivals for four decades. 

The surprise announcement comes at a time when law schools throughout the country are struggling to fill their seats, and first-year enrollment has dropped to a 40-year low. This would be the first merger of two law schools in memory, according to a spokesman for the American Bar Association, which accredits law schools. 

The new combined school will be called the Mitchell|Hamline School of Law, and will be located mainly on Mitchell’s campus in St. Paul. It will be headed by Mitchell’s new dean, Mark Gordon, who was appointed just last month. 

“What this is going to do is give the combined law school a sufficient size to be able to offer a truly robust program of legal education,” said Eric Janus, who is stepping down as Mitchell’s dean this summer. He said the newly combined school will have about 900 students. As of last year, Hamline had 439 students and Mitchell had 809. 

Jean Holloway, who was named Hamline’s first female law school dean in December 2013, declined to say if she’ll remain at the new school. “It remains to be seen,” she said. 

Janus acknowledged that combining the two schools will result in some cuts in faculty and staff. But he declined to speculate how many jobs may be lost and said he hoped to avoid layoffs through voluntary attrition. Mitchell has the equivalent of 35 full-time faculty members and Hamline has 26, according to school officials.” [Emphasis mine]

This is a watershed moment in U.S. “legal education.” I am glad to see that more “law professors” – including a recently installed dean – will be tossed in the trash, where they belong. Now these bitches and hags get to prove whether they could indeed land a job that pays much higher than a teaching position! At least, there will be fewer parasites on campus. 

http://www.twincities.com/education/ci_27521160/hamline-william-mitchell-law-schools-merge

Other Coverage: On February 13, 2015, Twin Cities Pioneer Press posted a Josh Verges article labeled “Hamline, William Mitchell law schools to merge.” Look at this portion:

“After four straight years of steep enrollment declines, St. Paul's two law schools have agreed to become one. 

The William Mitchell College of Law and Hamline University School of Law on Friday announced an agreement on a long-rumored merger -- the Mitchell-Hamline School of Law. 

The law school will exist primarily on the Mitchell campus, but some classes will be held at Hamline.

"It's a bold move, for sure, and probably long overdue," said Richard Kyle, president of the Minnesota State Bar Association and a Mitchell graduate. 

Law school enrollment in Minnesota and nationally has been in a tailspin. Anxiety over student loan debt is high, and job prospects for new lawyers have been slim since the Great Recession. 

Since peaking in 2010, first-year law school enrollment has fallen 28 percent across the country to its lowest point since 1973, the American Bar Association reported. 

At Hamline and Mitchell, first-year enrollment has dropped 56 percent in the past four years -- from a combined 584 to 259 this fall.” [Emphasis mine]

Now, scroll down to the end of the page, and review this info:

“BY THE NUMBERS 

- On U.S. News and World Report's latest annual ranking of 194 U.S. law schools, Hamline placed 121st and William Mitchell 135th. The University of Minnesota placed 20th and the University of St. Thomas 129th. 

- According to their most recent tax filings, William Mitchell lost nearly $1.6 million on $35 million in revenues in 2012-13, while Hamline made about $800,000 on revenue of about $122 million. An official for William Mitchell notes their loss was due to a one-time expense. During the fiscal years ending in 2011 and 2012, William Mitchell reported surpluses of $3.7 million and $2.9 million, respectively.” [Emphasis mine]

Clearly, these two steaming piles of waste didn’t merge because they were both in such extraordinary financial shape. Now that law school applicants are somewhat approaching “sophisticated consumer” status, fewer are applying to, and enrolling in, ABA-accredited toilets.

Conclusion: Good riddance to the third tier commode known as Hamline University Sewer of Law! On a side note, the former “director” of my toilet’s CDO was a Hamline JD. It has taken a lot of concerted effort – from many dedicated individuals – to reach this point. Let’s see how many other dung heaps and trash pits follow in these TTT footsteps. To those who have helped expose the law school scam, thank you. This is a great day, and you should to reflect on and enjoy your contribution to saving young people from financial hell.

56 comments:

  1. This is a great day. The scam victims can take justifiable pride in this happy event. But we must double down and continue to speak up. We know the stand alone toilets are in great financial difficulty, the question is how long universities will allow the massive deficits at their third tier and fourth law schools to continue before shutting them down. One way to accelerate the wonderful prospect: Get the Department of Education to pass regulations prohibiting the grant of any Federally guaranteed student loans to anyone with a LSAT score below 160. I doubt the Republican congress would challenge that one.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Let's hope this is like the first domino to fall. Although it's not quite a law school closing, it is kind of close right?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great Work Nando! I appreciate and enjoy your posts. You are the anti-scam MVP.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Fuck this..

    It's still scammy as Hell / Scam Heaven.

    Closing. Not merging. This way, the school is still ruining people's lives and futures. It's very survival, along with all the rest, IS the problem.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Someone has info on The University of ST Thomas Law School. Ranked 129th, and according to UST's ABA-required employment disclosures, 44.9% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term employment requiring a J.D. What 's the students'moral, the revenue, the profitability of this pit? They should have merged the 3 law schools in one:The St ASS of MitchHam Law School.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. University of St Thomas sold 180 acres to a health facility in 2014 so they have some cash to keep the scam going.

      Delete
  6. Okay, a stupid question.

    Does this so-called merger affect the tenure protections accorded to Hamline Law profs or, less likely, to William Mitchell Law profs? I know that a bona fide financial exigency overrides tenure, and so do certain kinds of reorganization.

    Would be nice to see a whole bunch of law profs get the boot without the soft landing of a lucrative buy-out package.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is not the only law school merger. Rutgers-Camden is merging with Rutgers-Newark as well. Know this, every merger has casualties. Moreover, a merger is tantamount to a closing because that is one less ABA accredited school on the long roster of schools. Rest assured in a merger, pink slips and buyouts will be doled out. This is GREAT news for the movement. I predict more closings disguised as "mergers" will be announced this year. Keep up the good work Nando.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right on. That's why Cooley merged with Western Michigan Univ. and why texas A & M purchased some fourth tier shithole a while back. There might've been one more that I forgot. If these big universities weren't so greedy they'd realize bleeding money on a law school is a bad idea.

      Delete
    2. The other private schools acquired by state schools are further in the past. Penn State, Michigan State, and New Hampshire.

      Delete
  8. Queue the Laughter!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm_GPkOfVKI

    ReplyDelete
  9. Just posted this great article on the top of my Facebook Wall so that all my friends can see what a waste of money, energy, and time law school really is. The cat is out of the bag and Hamline is the first to fall even though they claim they will still teach a few courses at their campus. Subtle way to close. Lets drive a stake through all these law school vampires hearts now. Victory Day is coming around the corner for the scamblogging movement.

    ReplyDelete
  10. So who are Touro, Brooklyn Law, and Cooley going to merge with? Each other?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Did anyone else rub one out 2 times yesterday? (And they was big ones too. I completely soaked one of the bath towels with my jiz.) Not bad for a 53 year old Georgetown JD eh?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Nando, your works of truth have contributed mightily to the ongoing demise of the law school scams. You are truly a great American. Keep up the great work my kneegrow!

    The Infamous John J. Bungsolaphagus AKA The Greatest Poster Known ("GPK"), Bringing Truth To Lawland Lemmings and Power Since 2006. God Bless!

    Twitter: @JBTheProphet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're not going to start that racist "kneegrow" ("negro") shit again are you? it doesn't even make sense or support a point. It's just pathological racism by now.

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    3. There is no "Message Discipline Troll." It's your own guilty conscience accusing you of being a racist. You people go crazy when a normal person calls you out on your obsessive use of racist terms and phrases.

      Good luck getting and keeping a job in 2015 with that kind of childish behavior...

      Delete
    4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    5. I'm against both racist behavior and the law school scam, and comment against both of them regularly on this blog.

      If you're that ashamed of being called out for your abusive and racist posts, that's a clue that you need to change your behavior. Hurts to be a social leper, doesn't it?

      Delete
    6. ^ Dude, you ONLY post here to defend a lazy shitbag who refuses to work.

      And everybody knows it.

      You are also extremely, ahem, VAGUE on exactly how criticism of a lily-white Ango-Saxon Paintroach is "racist."

      Are you Painter's Mom? Did he, like, tell on us?

      LOL

      Delete
    7. Man, that guy's sexual fantasies about other people are really out of control. What a pervert.

      If that's the best they can send here to try to defend their law school scam, then they are in serious, serious trouble. Not even a hint of a reasonable argument. Just attack, attack, attack, hate, hate, hate.

      Get ready for more of that open, evil hatred as the demise of the scam grows closer. Look at what we've all done by exposing the scam!

      Delete
    8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    9. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
  13. Mergers are like mixing two boxes of stale cereal and thinking that a fresh tasty coombination will emerge.

    ReplyDelete
  14. not that it matters, but isnt Cooley's Ann Arbor campus closing the first domino to fall?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Nando, that toilet was too clean for the topic of your article!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I won't get excited just yet. This is just a "merger."

    I'll start celebrating when a toilet actually goes under. If, let's say, Touro just closes shop abruptly, then I'll start to celebrate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There should be maybe 30-40 law schools at most. So even closing a few doesn't really solve anything. And really, outside the top 10 or so, the rest should be state schools that charge low tuition.

      Delete
    2. I can appreciate your point that there needs to be a drastic decrease in the number of law schools, but 30 to 40 may not be enough to sustain what's left of the profession. I think 80 to 100 would be about right myself. As a practical matter, just to reduce the human suffering of students and human suffering and to punish the immoral activities of the worst scammers, I'd settle for the worst 20 schools closing down.

      Delete
  17. As the law school applicant pool continues to plummet (it has not bottomed out yet), the scam artists masquerading as law school deans, professors and administrators will be faced with making difficult decisions. Bar passage rates will continue to drop as a result of law schools' decision to accept bottom of the barrel applicants who don't possess decent criteria to enter law school e.g., 3.5GPA/160LSAT. I cannot imagine that law schools are cash cows anymore to parent universities. I predict perks will start to shrink (e.g., paid sabbaticals, teaching only 1 course per semester, etc.). HamMitch can sugarcoat this merger all they want but the bottom line is that the ax will fall and one law school dean will be demoted/fired and several dead weight professors will be terminated. This is a victory for the law school scam movement. Hacks like Stevie Diamond can put on rose tinted glasses and pretend it's not raining but the reality is, these louses are on the run.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're absolutely right, this is a great victory and we should be celebrating.

      There's another subtlety here that many have missed. The merged institution will not only have fewer deans and professors living in luxury by exploiting the students. It will also have fewer students than the two schools had on their own. This guarantees that fewer debt-enslaved students will have to compete for jobs in the overcrowded Twin Cities market. That's a huge humanitarian achievement.

      Delete
    2. The vultures have already gotten over on he public, and the universities gave already profited nicely for the 25 years leading up to the collapse of the last five years. Bottom line, the mergers and closings will depend on each school's lost revenue threshold, but they won't occur en masse.

      If I scam the government for $100B, what do I care if I lose $15B before I have to close it restructure to stop the bleeding and possibly become profitable again?

      Delete
  18. "A Hamline...make that a Mitchell | Hamline sandwich, hold the Touro, with some McGeorge nuggets and a side of Golden Gate fries."

    ReplyDelete
  19. It is like Radio Shack merging with Blockbuster.

    ReplyDelete
  20. https://lawschooltuitionbubble.wordpress.com/2015/02/13/glaxosmithklinehamlinemitchell/

    Make sure to check out Matt Leichter’s February 13, 2015 LSTB entry entitled “GlaxoSmithKlineMitchellHamline.” Here is the full text of his piece:

    “The only thing that should surprise anyone less than Hamline’s and William Mitchell’s merger should be their new name, Hamline|Mitchell [UPDATE: It’s actually Mitchell|Hamline. No idea why I got that wrong.], which sounds like a self-satisfied pharmaceutical company. In fact, Mitchell was the product of five law schools between 1900 and 1956. It’s like planetary accretion.

    Personally, my money was on University of La Verne, which has still managed to stumble along, despite its superfluousness, but the biggest loser here is Slate‘s Jordan Weissmann who bet a mere $2.00 with UC-Berkeley’s Steven Davidoff Solomon that at least one law school would close or merge by 2018. Come on,everyone knew a law school would close or merge by 2018. Like, what were you thinking?? I swear, the best investment opportunities are squandered on the folks who can afford them.

    The only real news of note is what we still don’t know. From the Star Tribune:

    [Former Mitchell dean Eric] Janus acknowledged that combining the two schools will result in some cuts in faculty and staff. But he declined to speculate how many jobs may be lost, and said he hoped to avoid layoffs through voluntary attrition.

    For reference: Fall 2014 [Hamline, Mitchell]:

    • Full-Time Faculty: 14, 26
    • Deans, librarians, and others who teach: 11, 13
    • Part-Time: 33, 191

    The bad news for Minnesota’s legal market is former law profs competing for jobs—and I doubt their amazing experience as law profs will translate to partner offers.”

    The only correction I would make to this article is that William Mitchell Commode of Law is more akin to planetary excrement. By the way, does anyone think that two third tier toilets merging will result in the remaining single turd entering the second tier?!?!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At least when pharma companies merge, there is (usually) a viable business model present in both, and the execs are just trying to "leverage synergies", or some other corporate speak BS.

      A merger between two superfluous and moribund schools reminds me more of Studebaker and Packard getting together in the early '50s, which merely forestalled each one's collapse by about 10 years.

      With this in mind, I'd up the ante on the Weissmann-Solomon wager on the prop that the merged Mitchell-Hamline entity will be gone by 2025.

      Delete
    2. "Does anyone think that two third tier toilets merging will result in the remaining single turn entering the second tier?"

      I don't. My conjecture is that when two third tier toilets merge they will take the ranking of the lesser law school.

      Delete
  21. The impending merger of two officially not-for-profit law schools highlights some hard realities of legal education. It is evident that both Hamline and William Mitchell pay close attention to their revenues-versus-expenses situation, as one would expect from any rational group of people who operate in the real world. When declining enrollments and tuition income caused a drop in surplus of revenues to expenses, and even some years with losses exceeding gains, the schools took the heretofore unprecedented step of merging. They merged, much as openly for-profit enterprises often do in the realm of business when market share falls, profits erode, and losses mount.

    There's absolutely nothing unethical, immoral, or shady about doing what one legally can to maintain a net positive P&L sheet, in my opinion. It seems probable that, where physical proximity and business considerations permit, there will be additional law school mergers and acquisitions during the next few years. Revenues are down, expenses remain high, and competition for students is fierce and escalating (see the recent "predatory poaching" controversy). Even for law schools that pride themselves on being putatively "not for profit," it is essential to have a surplus of income over outgo. We in legal academe exert great semantic gymnastics to call that anything but "profit," but a rose by any other name would be as thorny.

    ReplyDelete
  22. The impending merger of two officially not-for-profit law schools highlights some hard realities of legal education. It is evident that both Hamline and William Mitchell pay close attention to their revenues-versus-expenses situation, as one would expect from any rational group of people who operate in the real world. When declining enrollments and tuition income caused a drop in surplus of revenues to expenses, and even some years with losses exceeding gains, the schools took the heretofore unprecedented step of merging. They merged, much as openly for-profit enterprises often do in the realm of business when market share falls, profits erode, and losses mount.



    There's absolutely nothing unethical, immoral, or shady about doing what one legally can to maintain a net positive P&L sheet, in my opinion. It seems probable that, where physical proximity and business considerations permit, there will be additional law school mergers and acquisitions during the next few years. Revenues are down, expenses remain high, and competition for students is fierce and escalating (see the recent "predatory poaching" controversy). Even for law schools that pride themselves on being putatively "not for profit," it is essential to have a surplus of income over outgo. We in legal academe exert great semantic gymnastics to call that anything but "profit," but a rose by any other name would be as thorny.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How do the expenses remain high? They can always stop building new jacuzzis for their Deans.

      It costs dick to run a law school, that's why they're so popular.

      Delete
    2. You seem only to see the symptoms of the legal education industry's scam and not the cause. The problem isn't that $chool$ are "doing what one legally can to maintain a net positive P&L sheet," the problem is that they now need to decrease in size. More specifically, that they grew so untenable and employed so many unnecessary administrators in the first place. Even more specifically, this cancer has been debt-financed, and employment outcomes were hardly a consideration during the bubble.

      I can only hope that the disaster caused by such naïveté about market conditions returns back to the people who caused it. Perhaps that's wishful thinking; this is just one more area where the legislators (i.e. boomers) supporting "education" without regard to market forces have been debt-financing this country's disastrous fiscal conditions for decades.

      Delete
    3. Ha ha ha ha, sorry, John all your endeavors are immoral, and rapidly running out of vogue and other people's money.

      So, please tell us how it's essential that the law schools that have unwisely employed you simply decide that people who "work" 15 hours a week need $450,000 per "year" (non-inclusive of summers, or grading more than ONE ASSIGNMENT per class, per semester).

      You're a scammer, John. In a better country, you'd rot in prison for the rest of your life.

      Delete
    4. The critical issue is that law schools claim to be acting for the good of the student, and the official stance of the government and the result of many years of conditioning is that non-profit education is inherently good. This is simply not true, and some of us are finally waking up to this fact.

      However, the public is waking up much too slowly. We need to continue working to fight the scam and expose the law schools (and ultimately all universities) for what they are: profit-driven enterprises who perform their duties to their de facto shareholders, the faculty and administration. Only then can real change happen.

      Delete
  23. Just noticed that Donna Furiosa deleted her entire blog, Scholastic Snake Oil. Really a shame, she was an excellent writer.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Nando, the legal market in Minneapolis is so saturated, that lawyers are taking cases for no money down. I have been practicing consumer bankruptcy law for over 25 years. When I first started practicing, I typically charged $2,500-$3,000 for Chapter 7 cases (circa 1990). Nowadays, young lawyers have driven down the cost of bankruptcy and other legal services that practitioners are resorting to "no money down" gimmicks just to compete for business. Don't believe me? Take a gander at this poor SOB attorney's craigslist ad:

    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ram/lgs/4889048278.html

    Anyone who is crazy enough to enroll in Hamline/St. Thomas/Mitchell and get in over six figures of student loan debt is a miser who deserves penury. Big firms are not hiring from these schools and the small shops that cherry pick from the top 5 STUDENTS (not %) from these 4th tier trash pits are only paying $30-40K a year. Law schools love to fool lemmings into believing that there is a magical Mid-Law option for entry level grads which pay $65-80K a year. These jobs have something in common with Bigfoot and unicorns: they don't exist for recent grads with no experience. So it's either be a top 5 student, get a job which pays peanuts or hang a shingle. If you have a shingle, be prepared to work for "no money down" while living a Spartan existence.

    Law school is a SCAM. I realize many kids don't want to hear about this since "being a lawyer" has been a life long childhood dream. The reality is there is no glory, prestige or wealth in this profession anymore.

    In my local courthouse, the janitor earns more than the public defender attorney. This is a fact. The janitor has better job security and has no student loan debt. Don't be duped into going to law school just so that you can keep people like Erwin Chemerinsky and his wife accustomed to a royal lifestyle. This scam is vicious. It is 2015, if you don't know that law school is a scam, you are too dumb to live in this world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Assistant Prosecutor position near me: Part time, 20,000/year, no benefits.

      Delete
  25. Salaries at Biglaw firms have remained stagnant for nearly a decade. Biglaw bonuses today are half of what they were in 2007. Small law firms are paying anywhere between $20-35K a year, with no vacation time, health insurance or retirement plan. Starbucks at least offers baristas health insurance, profit sharing, paid vacation/sick time and free coffee. With these abysmal prospects, why on earth would anyone roll the dice on a law degree today?

    Plumbers, auto mechanics, HVAC repairmen and unionized carpenters make more than most newly minted attorneys. They live better lifestyles and don't have to tolerate abuse from asshole partners and psychotic clients. It amazes me that these law schools attract students like a pile of shit attracts flies.

    ReplyDelete
  26. http://abovethelaw.com/2015/02/two-lower-tier-law-schools-merge-to-become-one-lower-tier-law-school/

    On February 13, 2015, Joe Patrice authored an ATL piece labeled “Two Lower-Tier Law Schools Merge To Become…One Lower-Tier Law School.” Check out this choice portion below:

    “The law school game is getting rough. Students are starting to wise up that charging nearly $150K for a degree in a market where there are more than 3 barred attorneys for every available law job is a losing proposition. Consequently, law school applications have absolutely tanked. Some people argue that this actually makes this a great time to go to law school. They are wrong.

    But we can all agree that the applications collapse is really bad news for the bottom-tier schools that rely on putting impressionable asses in seats to keep afloat. And I single out the lower-tier schools, because it’s not like the T14 are feeling the pinch… they just get less selective while the lower-ranked schools have to perform some magic to keep the scheme going. Some schools have turned to layoffs. Others have closed campuses.

    And some are talking merger. Today, Minnesota-based law schools William Mitchell (U.S. News #135) and Hamline (U.S. News #121) — we normally cite our own Above the Law Law School Rankings, but we only rank the top 50 — announced their plan to merge.”

    Sadly, many morons will still apply to this combined dung pit. This country contains many of the best minds on the planet – many due to the brain drain from dirt poor nations – and a legion of dimwits. Plus, there are too damn many idealist, college idiots who believe that THEY are going to attend a sewer and help “the underprivileged” and somehow “balance the playing field.”

    Apparently, these poor fools had parents who doted on them and incessantly told them that they can do anything that they put their put their little minds to, since they were infants. Unfortunately, this garbage was reinforced by soft-headed teachers from K-12 – as well as distant relatives, peers, family friends, TV, school coun$elor$, and an assortment of other well-meaning ass-hats.

    Frankly, law schools outside the top 10 or so thrive on these lemmings. Who the hell decides to incur an additional $120K+ in NON-DISCHARGEABLE debt – for a chance to be a low-paid legal aid dolt or a broke-ass sole practitioner?!?! The pigs will continue to roll out idiotic clinics that will NOT lead to legal jobs for JDs, because these waterheads will keep enrolling in these stupid programs. Even with the plethora of information out there now with regard to the law school scam, dreamers of average intelligence and no "pedigree" are still applying to certified ABA toilets.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Isn't it fucked up how law schools are operating like three card monte operators? They play the shell game by changing names (e.g., Cooley a/k/a Western Michigan, Phoenix Law a/k/a Arizona Summit, etc.) and deploying the merger strategy.

    Regardless of these con games, it is a well known fact that a law degree is a losing proposition. Even a T14 at sticker is an unsound decision as the longevity of a Biglaw career has shrunken in recent years. Too many Biglaw refugees are joining the doc review and solo practice circuit. That wasn't the case 15 years ago.

    There has been a seismic shift in the legal profession. Since 2009, scam deans have stated that the market is rebounding. It hasn't and it won't in the near foreseeable future. I see more and more attorney ads on the internet basically offering legal services for less than the neighborhood hooker would charge for a blow job. In fact, didn't an attractive solo attorney get pinched for giving BJs in Illinois to supplement her solo career earnings? It is sheer madness to contemplate law school. If I was a legal employer, I would skip from consideration hiring anyone who attends law school today or attended after 2010. Clearly these morons couldn't read the facile writing on the wall.

    ReplyDelete
  28. This is an important message to all attorneys who have struggled to pass the bar and go through three years of law schools to be part of what was meant to be a dignified profession: the writing is on the wall for most attorneys with the new LLLT program that has been implemented by the state of Washington and will soon spread to every state in the country. Do not doubt that this is the ultimate goal of the elites coming to full realization. Now that the elites have seen the grass roots movement to lower applicants to law school against their wishes is finally succeeding, in a panic they are rapidly implementing what is known as the LLLT program (perhaps their acronym is a subtle jab at the LTTT lower tier 3 law school designation)? This LLLT program effectively allows people with ASSOCIATES DEGREES TO BECOME ATTORNEYS. They will be permitted to give legal advice to everyone in their area of expertise, they will be permitted to fill out and draft all applicable forms, and they will be able to counsel their clients regarding how to speak with and present their case before the judge.

    This is effectively sidelining all middle class attorneys. The elite banking and insurance cartels are doing this for two reasons: (1) by reducing the number of qualified and intelligent plaintiffs' attorneys, lawsuits and large settlements against banks and insurers will diminish significantly; and (2) by creating such a dearth of work in the area of plaintiffs' litigation, the defense litigation market will be flooded with new arrivals all competing for the same piece of the smaller pie. This will allow insurance defense attorney hourly rates to plummet. Everyone, you must understand that the writing is on the wall. The elites were shocked at the challenge to their power in the blogosphere.

    This is the latest scam the elites are foisting upon every day normal plaintiffs' attorneys and WE MUST STAND UP TO THIS INJUSTICE! We did not go to law school for three years and endure all of our trials and tribulations to be dealt this wretched and disrespectful hand, that degrades our traditionally noble profession. The American Bar association recently published this article promoting LLLT practice (http://www.americanbar.org/publications/gp_solo/2014/may_june/restore_access_justice_through_limited_license_legal_technicians.html), and the logic, of course, is horrifically flawed. They claim that attorneys will be able to leverage the services of LLLTs in their own practice. That is a completely bogus argument. LLLTs will not require attorney supervision in the provision of their services and legal advice,there will be no reason or ability to pay in-house LLLTs to deliver services on behalf of your firm in a profitable fashion. The entire thing is a scam designed to further destroy the every-day legal practitioner! This is the elite's latest attempt to circumvent the plummeting law school applicants that we have finally achieved as a result of the scam bloggers' concerted effort in getting the word out that law school was a complete scam since at least the year 2001. The elite obviously panicked when they found out what was happening to their precious law school expansion agenda. What is the solution of the elite to this? Bypass JD and licensure completely! These people will not even need a prerequisite bachelor's degree!

    It is unbelievable and we must speak out before it is too late. There is no such thing as a free lunch for legal services or any other sector of our economy. You cannot expect people to work for free without delivering a shoddy and low quality work product. While the banking elites lobby the American Bar Association and instruct them to write articles (like the one I linked above) instructing us to sit back and accept our declining pay and professional expertise, isn't it telling that nobody has lobbied for any decrease in the salaries and bonuses of the banking and insurance cartels on Wall Street?

    ReplyDelete
  29. http://jdunderground.com/all/thread.php?threadId=85437

    On February 13, 2015, 11:06 am, JDU accountholder “mnjd” started a thread simply entitled “Hamline and Mitchell to Merge.” Now, look at this reply from user “loserthon” on the same day at 3:03 pm:

    http://jdunderground.com/all/thread.php?threadId=85437#post1174356

    “Hamline was one of the first schools that was projected to close due to declining enrollment. What does Mitchell get out of it?”

    JDU denizen “johnyquest” responded with this conjecture on February 13, 2015 at 5:48 pm:

    “I guess Mitchell gets a bunch of additional students and gets one less competitor for a limited pool of students, and Hamline has a place to offload its current students after it shuts down. Are the school's located pretty close together such that students will not have to move?”

    http://jdunderground.com/all/thread.php?threadId=85437#post1174526

    Strong poster “ichininosan” then shared this brilliant comment on February 13, 2015, 6:19 pm:

    “Mitchell probably gets a lot of revenue out of this. Each of the students at Hamline are probably worth about $25K / year (on average) in federal loan revenue. If 400 students go from Hamline to the "merged" school that's a cool $10 million annual revenue stream. The interesting question is what the Hamline professors got in return for this revenue stream. I'm assuming the alternative scenario they were potentially facing was a shut down of Hamline' law school by the parent institution. Who knows, maybe William Mitchell was facing its own Doomsday scenario because it lacks a parent institution.

    Maybe Hamline offered a roughly $10 million federal loan revenue stream and may ease Mitchell agreed to save a few profs from being laid off.

    The moral of the story: never leave money on the table.”

    He nailed it perfectly with that last line: these sick bitches and hags will never leave money on the table. In the final crude analysis, these “educators” are playing roulette with YOUR future and financial health, lemmings! They are paid up front, in full – typically via federal student loan money – while YOU are left holding the bag and incurring ALL of the risk. Got that, mental midget?!?! Did that knowledge penetrate your tiny gray matter, Dumbass?!

    ReplyDelete
  30. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrObV84tD8g

    ReplyDelete
  31. Thank you to Nando for the honest insight. When I was attending HSOL from 84-87 it is doubtful that their professors sans Richard Oakes had any real meaningful experience litigating jury trials. Absent any meaningful practical experience, good intentions aside, these professors graduated students with almost no meaningful practical experience. I apologize for forgetting her name, but the exception was a clinic organized to assist the Hmong community with their SSDI claims, in a very successful manner. Poor Professor Butterfoss, a kind man, would incessantly regale his first year Contract students with what appeared to be the highlight of his private legal career. That being prosecuting some claim in I believe Philadelphia Small Claims Court for a friend of hid firm's senior partner. Indeed all realistic students at Hamline knew we were there because of some flaw: lack of intelligence; and or poor undergraduate grades; and or poor performance on the LSAT, The grading system was a joke. Low grades were the exception rather than the rule. I guess to proof to the ABA that they were an academically inclined institution. I guess one could also argue that the poor grades were the result of poor teaching and or a substandard student body. Adam Smith albeit his hand is invisible probably has the answer to the rationale of the merger i.e. with law school applications having declined as much as 100%(half) it was obvious neither if these schools were going to last as economically viable institutions. Good luck to William Mitchell maybe things will get better but I predict a schism between what is left of each school until they close for good e.g Northwest Airlines and Republic. Que Sera Sera

    ReplyDelete

 
Web Analytics